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Community News Archives for 2021-11

Breakfast with the Grinch

The WREB Giant FM Christmas tree was nearly stolen yesterday! The Christmas tree at the WREB GiantFM studio may be small, but it still belongs to WREB. We were lucky to have Chrysta Snellenberger on hand to prevent the theft.

 

The Grinch is on vacation from Whoville and decided to visit the studio to announce he will be at the 3 Fat Labs Wedding Barn (2009 South County Road 400 West, Greencastle, IN 46135) on Saturday, December 11, 2021 from 10:00 AM to 11:30 AM and with the help of the Greencastle Parks and Recreation department, is extending an invite to everyone in the county.

 

DePauw University’s Bon Appétit will be catering a buffet style breakfast. The buffet will include eggs and ham (not to worry, they are not green!), fruit, juice, and milk. For added fun, participants can come dressed as either Cindy Lou Who or Max and be entered into the Look Alike contest.

 

If you are interested, simply visit greencastleparks.com to register.

 

Be an Active Family During the Holidays

 

The holiday season can be a busy and stressful time for families.  Along with those hectic schedules, the cold winter weather can make it challenging for squeezing in some physical activity each day.  However, being active as a family can benefit everyone.  Adults need at least 2½ hours of physical activity a week, and children need 60 minutes a day.  Follow these tips to add more activity during the winter months:

  1. Schedule some time for physical activity.  Determine time slots throughout the week when most family members available.  Devote a few of these times to doing something active.  If you put it on your calendar and treat it like an appointment, you will be much more likely to follow through with it.  Anything that gets your heart beating faster and activities that make your muscles work harder than usual counts as physical activity.  If you are short on time, start with just 5 minutes.  Set a reachable goal and work up toward the recommended amount.  Just remember to move more and sit less during the day.
  2. Turn off the screens.  Instead of watching TV or playing video games, create an indoor obstacle course, make a scavenger hunt or play charades.  Being active as a family not only creates special memories but helps to relieve holiday stress.
  3. Bundle up for outdoor play. Create a snowman or “snow family”.  Climb a snow mountain or make paths through the snow.  No snow?  Walk around your neighborhood to view lighting displays rather than taking the car.
  4. Don’t ditch the housework.  We all have experienced the tiring effects of doing chores.  But those chores are a great way to add physical activity and have a clean house – ready for holiday guests.  Kids can help vacuum, dust, sweep the floor and even clean the windows!
  5. Treat the family with fun physical activity.  Enjoyable experiences such as an afternoon of ice skating or an evening of bowling make great gifts.  A membership to the YMCA or recreational club can give your family fun opportunities for physical activity all throughout the year.  Don’t forget to have fun on your local sledding hill as well!
  6. Incorporate easy activities to get moving during the holidays.  Simple tips like parking at the far end of the parking lot, using the stairs instead of escalators, and dancing to your favorite holiday music can make a huge difference!

Source: Nebraska Extension

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events.  Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm.  Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request.  It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs.  While many publications are free, some do have a fee.  All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

December 9 – Bi-State Crops Conference, Beef House, 9 am-1:30 pm, $40 + credit fee, register at: https://bit.ly/BiStateCrops2021  

December 15 - Winter PARP, Off the Rails Event Center (Roachdale), 9-11 am, no charge, register at: https://tinyurl.com/PutnamPARP2021

December 15 - ServSafe Food Manager 1-Day Class & Online Exam, 9am-4pm, register at: www.purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

December 22-31 – Extension Office Closed for Winter Holidays


Year End Income Tax Deduction Options

End of year is a time that many begin to finalize tax considerations and reflect on the past calendar year. You may receive a return of a 50 percent direct credit to your tax bill when donating up to $200 per individual and $400 for couples filing jointly, given to an Indiana funded university. Because Purdue Extension is part of a state funded university, one can donate to the local Extension Office that would qualify. Therefore a $100 contribution to the Purdue Extension-Putnam County program would cost one only $50. You can also specify in many cases how you would like the money to be used (i.e. 4-H, youth development, agriculture, natural resource, or health and human science educational programming or equipment, etc.). One could even specify the gift be used for a specific educational program or topic (i.e. 4-H robotics, advanced Master Gardener workshop, nutrition education, workforce development workshop, etc.). Some limitations do exist. For example, funds donated for awards or scholarships would not be eligible for the additional direct state tax deduction. Give the Extension office a call and ask about this excellent way you can support community programs for minimal cost to your pocket due to the additional state tax break.

Another option is that local Extension positions may be endowed with a family name or business for example. There are also family scholarships that may be set up to specifically benefit Putnam County or even multiple counties. Land or other assets may also be willed or donated to sponsor larger gifts as well. This can be done through the Purdue Foundation and also can be done over time and there is no percentage fee taken out of the gift like there are at many foundations.

One can also donate to the Putnam County Community Foundation and name the “Putnam County Fairground Endowment” as the recipient. While this option is not eligible for the 50% state tax credit that a state funded university or college provides, it is a great option in that the Putnam County Community Foundation is a 501(c)3 entity which provides opportunity for the general state and federal income tax deduction via a reduction in taxable income. And a donation to Fairgrounds endowment certainly helps Extension programs who often benefit because they use the Putnam Fairgrounds facilities. If you desire to see the fairgrounds maintained for your children and grandchildren, this option will certainly benefit the facility. The goal for the Putnam County Fairgrounds Endowment is one million dollars and this is a very important philanthropic effort to stay abreast in assuring a quality facility for future Putnam County Fairs! Additionally, it could be grain or livestock that is given to fund one of the Putnam County Community Foundation fund options. The Putnam County Community Foundation also manages four previously established scholarships that are set up to benefit Putnam 4-Hers where donations could be made as well.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

November 22, 29 & Dec. 6, 13 – Know Your Numbers, Know Your Options, 10 am, virtual, $20, register at: https://cvent.me/n24R23

November 25-26 – Extension office closed for Thanksgiving Holiday

December 9 – Bi-State Crops Conference, Beef House, 9 am – 1:30 pm, $40+ credit fee,
                        register at: https://bit.ly/BiStateCrops2021

December 15 - Winter PARP, Off The Rails Event Center (Roachdale), 9-11 am, no
                         charge, register at: https://tinyurl.com/PutnamPARP2021

 

 

Boy Scouts ceremoniously retire American Flag

Braving the moist, chilled weather Thursday evening, Boy Scout Troop 99 ceremoniously retired an American Flag.

There are three ways to properly and respectfully retire a worn American Flag that is beyond repair; burning, burial, or recycling. Burning is the preferred method according to the United States Flag Code, Title 4, Section 8k which states, “The flag, when it is in such condition that it is no longer a fitting emblem of display, should be destroyed in a dignified way, preferably by burning.”

Boy Scout Troop 99 followed a specific ceremony to not only honor the American Flag, but also the veterans who served this nation under the symbol of the American Flag. The American Flag is considered to be a symbol of democracy, something veterans have fought to maintain. It is considered it a great honor to be asked to perform the Flag Retirement Ceremony.

The Boy Scouts diligently followed the pomp and circumstance, conducting themselves with reverence and respect. Despite the cold, they proudly displayed their uniforms and performed a final Pledge of Allegiance to the flag before reverently placing the flag atop the fire and setting it ablaze. Then, they surrounded the fire pit, watching over the flag as it retired into ash. The Cub Scouts of Pack 99 even surrounded the fire, learning the importance of such a ceremony.

According to Wade Harper, 17, “Retiring an American Flag is a sacred and important tradition that I am proud to be a part of. To retire an American Flag it must be burnt on a fire until there is nothing left. Being part of the color guard, I had the honor of carrying and laying our beautiful flag on the fire. Having mayor Dory and Representative Jim Baird there was really special and added a new layer of importance to the event. I will always remember standing around the fire with my fellow Scouts both young and old and the look of pride on the veteran’s faces as the young generation carried on this sacred tradition.”

With a final salute, the flag was laid to rest in the presence of Mayor Dory, representatives Jim and Beau Baird, and several veterans.

 

 


NUISANCE INSECTS ARE OUT & ABOUT

Last weekend when I was outside, I got reminded that it is time to be on the lookout for a few of those nuisance insects we annually deal with. The insects I am referring to are the Asian lady beetle, boxelder bug, and brown marmorated stink bug.

Asian lady beetles can vary in color, but they all can be identified by looking at their thorax (area between the head and wing covers) for a black “M.” Sometimes the “M” is darker and more obvious, but it is always there. Asian lady beetles will not stay outside for long following a cold snap. Therefore, it is important that you take time and fill any cracks or holes leading into your house. Once inside the house, the beetles essentially remain in a hibernation-like mode for several months. After warm weather hits, the beetles spring back to life and begin crawling around intensifying the nuisance factor.

Purdue publication E-214-W, “Asian Lady Beetles,” list four good control methods to use when handling these beetles. First, seal them out of your home by caulking and repairing openings. Second, use pesticides as a perimeter treatment. Third, use indoor pesticides to provide temporary control. The previous mentioned publication provides a list of pesticide products that can be used. Lastly, vacuum or sweep the beetles up.

In comparison, adult boxelder bugs are dark brown to black in color with red lines on their backs. Their young are wingless and have red bodies with a yellow line down the center of it. They are a nuisance because they invade homes once fall temperatures begin to drop. They squeeze into cracks in the foundation, windows, doors, and under siding and shingles in search of a way into a house. Thus, it is important that you take time to seal off all openings to your house.

Once in the house, you can get rid of boxelder bugs by using household insecticides containing pyrethrins or resmethrin. Please remember to read and follow all labels when using any insecticide. However, it might be easier to use a vacuum cleaner to get rid of the boxelder bugs instead. For more information look online for Purdue publication E-24-W, “Boxelder Bugs.”

Lastly, brown marmorated stink bugs are mottled brown in color and have bands of light and dark brown on their antennae. They can emit a pungent over when they are disturbed. In the spring and summer, they are found outdoors, but like the Asian lady beetle and boxelder bug, they find their way indoors during the fall. They will enter through cracks and crevices, chimneys, and any other small holes that might exist. Therefore, trying to seal the cracks and crevices, when possible, is the best defense from these insects.

Inside, they don’t do a lot of damage, but are a nuisance and can create an odor. When you spot a brown marmorated stink bug in your house, consider putting it in a container of soapy water. This will kill the insect and lessen the impact of the odor. For more information about brown marmorated stink bugs, check out Purdue publication E-273-W, “Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in Homes.”

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local Purdue Extension Office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution. All times listed are Eastern Time.

Upcoming Events:

November 17 – Insights From Consumer Research That You Can Take Home To The
                          Farm webinar, 12 pm register at https://tinyurl.com/WIAWebinars21

November 17 – ServSafe 1-Day Class and Online Exam, 9am-4pm, register at
                          https://purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

November 18 - Digging Deeper Into Land Leases, 10:00 am, virtual, $25, register at:
                         https://cvent.me/gmRR08

November 22 – Curb the Urge to Splurge on Holiday Spending, 2pm, register at
                          https://tinyurl.com/healthandwealthseries21

November 22, 29 & Dec. 6, 13 – Know Your Numbers, Know Your Options, 10 am, virtual,
                                                    $20, register at: https://cvent.me/n24R23

November 25-26 – Extension office closed for Thanksgiving Holiday

December 9 – Bi-State Crops Conference, Beef House, 9 am – 1:30 pm, $40+ credit fee,
                        register at: https://bit.ly/BiStateCrops2021

December 15 - Winter PARP, Off The Rails Event Center (Roachdale), 9-11 am, no
                         charge, register at: https://tinyurl.com/PutnamPARP2021

NUISANCE INSECTS ARE OUT & ABOUT

Last weekend when I was outside, I got reminded that it is time to be on the lookout for a few of those nuisance insects we annually deal with. The insects I am referring to are the Asian lady beetle, boxelder bug, and brown marmorated stink bug.

Asian lady beetles can vary in color, but they all can be identified by looking at their thorax (area between the head and wing covers) for a black “M.” Sometimes the “M” is darker and more obvious, but it is always there. Asian lady beetles will not stay outside for long following a cold snap. Therefore, it is important that you take time and fill any cracks or holes leading into your house. Once inside the house, the beetles essentially remain in a hibernation-like mode for several months. After warm weather hits, the beetles spring back to life and begin crawling around intensifying the nuisance factor.

Purdue publication E-214-W, “Asian Lady Beetles,” list four good control methods to use when handling these beetles. First, seal them out of your home by caulking and repairing openings. Second, use pesticides as a perimeter treatment. Third, use indoor pesticides to provide temporary control. The previous mentioned publication provides a list of pesticide products that can be used. Lastly, vacuum or sweep the beetles up.

In comparison, adult boxelder bugs are dark brown to black in color with red lines on their backs. Their young are wingless and have red bodies with a yellow line down the center of it. They are a nuisance because they invade homes once fall temperatures begin to drop. They squeeze into cracks in the foundation, windows, doors, and under siding and shingles in search of a way into a house. Thus, it is important that you take time to seal off all openings to your house.

Once in the house, you can get rid of boxelder bugs by using household insecticides containing pyrethrins or resmethrin. Please remember to read and follow all labels when using any insecticide. However, it might be easier to use a vacuum cleaner to get rid of the boxelder bugs instead. For more information look online for Purdue publication E-24-W, “Boxelder Bugs.”

Lastly, brown marmorated stink bugs are mottled brown in color and have bands of light and dark brown on their antennae. They can emit a pungent over when they are disturbed. In the spring and summer, they are found outdoors, but like the Asian lady beetle and boxelder bug, they find their way indoors during the fall. They will enter through cracks and crevices, chimneys, and any other small holes that might exist. Therefore, trying to seal the cracks and crevices, when possible, is the best defense from these insects.

Inside, they don’t do a lot of damage, but are a nuisance and can create an odor. When you spot a brown marmorated stink bug in your house, consider putting it in a container of soapy water. This will kill the insect and lessen the impact of the odor. For more information about brown marmorated stink bugs, check out Purdue publication E-273-W, “Brown Marmorated Stink Bug in Homes.”

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local Purdue Extension Office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution. All times listed are Eastern Time.

Upcoming Events:

November 17 – Insights From Consumer Research That You Can Take Home To The
                          Farm webinar, 12 pm register at https://tinyurl.com/WIAWebinars21

November 17 – ServSafe 1-Day Class and Online Exam, 9am-4pm, register at
                          https://purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

November 18 - Digging Deeper Into Land Leases, 10:00 am, virtual, $25, register at:
                         https://cvent.me/gmRR08

November 22 – Curb the Urge to Splurge on Holiday Spending, 2pm, register at
                          https://tinyurl.com/healthandwealthseries21

November 22, 29 & Dec. 6, 13 – Know Your Numbers, Know Your Options, 10 am, virtual,
                                                    $20, register at: https://cvent.me/n24R23

November 25-26 – Extension office closed for Thanksgiving Holiday

December 9 – Bi-State Crops Conference, Beef House, 9 am – 1:30 pm, $40+ credit fee,
                        register at: https://bit.ly/BiStateCrops2021

December 15 - Winter PARP, Off The Rails Event Center (Roachdale), 9-11 am, no
                         charge, register at: https://tinyurl.com/PutnamPARP2021


Removing Odors from Refrigerators and Freezers

Refrigerators and freezers are two of the most important pieces of equipment in the kitchen for keeping food safe. We are instantly reminded of their importance when the power goes off, flooding occurs, or the unit fails, causing food to become unsafe and spoil. The odors that develop when food spoils can be difficult to remove. Use this information to learn how to remove odors from units or how to safely discard an affected unit.

If food has spoiled in a refrigerator or freezer and odors from the food remain, they may be difficult to remove. The following procedures may help but may have to be repeated several times.

  • Dispose of any spoiled or questionable food.
  • Remove shelves, crispers, and ice trays. Wash them thoroughly with hot water and detergent. Then rinse with a sanitizing solution (1 tablespoon unscented, liquid chlorine bleach per gallon of water).
  • Wash the interior of the refrigerator and freezer, including the door and gasket, with hot water and baking soda. Rinse with sanitizing solution as above.
  • Leave the door open for about 15 minutes to allow free air circulation.

If odors remain, try any or all of the following:

  • Wipe inside of unit with equal parts vinegar and water. Vinegar provides acid which destroys mildew.
  • Leave the door open and allow to air out for several days.
  • Stuff both the refrigerator and freezer with rolled newspapers. Close the door and leave for several days. Remove paper and clean with vinegar and water.
  • Sprinkle fresh coffee grounds or baking soda loosely in a large, shallow container in the bottom of the refrigerator and freezer.
  • Place a cotton swab soaked with vanilla inside the refrigerator and freezer. Close door for 24 hours. Check for odors.
  • Use a commercial product available at hardware and housewares stores. Follow the manufacturer's instructions.

If Odors Cannot Be Removed

If odors cannot be removed, then the refrigerator or freezer may need to be discarded. If you need to discard the refrigerator or freezer, discard it in a safe manner:

  • "Childproof" old refrigerators or freezers so children do not get trapped inside. The surest way is to take the door off.
  • If the door will not come off, chain and padlock the door permanently and close tightly, or remove or disable the latch completely so the door will no longer lock when closed.

It is unlawful in many jurisdictions to discard old refrigerators or freezers without first removing the door.

Depending on where you live, your appliance will be picked up by your solid waste provider, a recycler, a retailer (if you buy a new unit), or program sponsored by local or regional utilities.

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture – Food Safety and Inspection Service

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

November 11 – Extension Office closed for Veteran’s Day

November 15 – Diabetes & the Holidays, 10:00 am, virtual, register at https://tinyurl.com/healthandwealthseries21

November 16 – Digging Deeper into Land Leases, 6:30 pm, virtual, $25, register at: https://cvent.me/gmRR08

November 17 – Insights from Consumer Research That You Can Take Home to The Farm webinar, 12:00 pm register at https://tinyurl.com/WIAWebinars21

November 17 – ServSafe 1-Day Class and Online Exam, 9am-4pm, register at https://purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

November 18 - Digging Deeper into Land Leases, 10:00 am, virtual, $25, register at: https://cvent.me/gmRR08

November 22 – Curb the Urge to Splurge on Holiday Spending, 2:00 pm, virtual, register at https://tinyurl.com/healthandwealthseries21

November 22, 29 & Dec. 6, 13 – Know Your Numbers, Know Your Options, 10 am, virtual, $20, register at: https://cvent.me/n24R23   

November 25-26 – Extension office closed for Thanksgiving Holiday

Daylight Saving Time coming to end – Don't forget to Turn and Test

It’s time to fall back as daylight saving time ends this Sunday, Nov. 7 at 2 a.m.

 

As people turn their clocks back one hour, the American Red Cross reminds everyone to test their smoke alarms.

 

This weekend is also a good time for everyone to take these lifesaving steps to help prepare households for home fires, the nation’s most frequent disaster:

 

  • Check smoke alarms and replace batteries if needed. Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in a home fire by half. Test smoke alarms once a month. Change the batteries at least once a year if your model requires it. Place smoke alarms on every level of your home, including inside and outside bedrooms, and sleeping areas.

 

  • Create and practice your home fire escape plan. Fire experts agree that people may have as little as two minutes to escape a burning home before it’s too late. This weekend, create a home fire escape plan with your household and practice it until everyone can escape in less than two minutes. Escape plans should include at least two ways to escape from every room and a meeting spot at a safe distance away from your home, such as your neighbor’s home or landmark like a specific tree in your front yard, where everyone knows where to meet.

Home Fire Campaign Saving Lives

Each year, the Red Cross responds to more than 62,000 disasters—the vast majority of which are home fires. Every day, seven people die in home fires, and most tragedies occur in homes without working smoke alarms. That’s why the Red Cross launched the Home Fire Campaign with community partners in 2014 to reduce needless deaths and injuries.

 

So far, the Home Fire Campaign has reached more than 1.7 million people and is credited with saving more than 1,000 lives across the country. The Indiana Region has installed more than 400 smoke alarms and made over 220 homes safer so far this year as part of the national Red Cross Home Fire Campaign. Since the campaign’s inception, volunteers and partners have also:

 

  • Installed more than 2.2 million free smoke alarms
  • Reached more than 1.6 million children through youth preparedness programs
  • Made more than 948,000 households safer from the threat of home fires

 

People can visit redcross.org/homefires for free resources and to learn more about how to protect themselves and their loved homes from fire, or contact their local Red Cross to find out about smoke alarm installation events in their community.


DNR offers free admission to veterans, active-duty military, Nov. 11

All veterans and active-duty military personnel, and everyone in their vehicle, will be admitted free to DNR state parks, reservoir properties, state forest recreation areas and state off-road vehicle riding areas on Veterans Day, Thursday, Nov. 11.

This includes admission to Falls of the Ohio State Park’s Interpretive Center.

“We appreciate the sacrifices and service of our veterans and active-duty military and look forward to recognizing them with a day to explore some of the best outdoor places in our state,” said Terry Coleman, director of Indiana State Parks.

Veterans and military personnel should present ID or evidence of military service where entrance gates are in operation. For proof of military status, gate attendants will accept:

 

—Discharge papers (veteran’s DD Form 214)

—Veteran license plates: Ex-POW, Purple Heart, Disabled Hoosier Veteran, Pearl Harbor Survivor. Veteran license plates also include:

—Air Force Veteran

—Army Veteran

—Coast Guard Veteran

—Marine Corps Veteran

—Merchant Marine Veteran

—Navy Veteran

—U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs Disability Award Letter

—Veterans hunting and fishing license

—Documents showing veteran benefits with veteran’s name on document

—Any other certificate or verification letter or form that establishes past or present military service

 

For general information about state park, reservoir, forest properties, and state off-road vehicle riding areas, see dnr.IN.gov.

INDOT opens applications for engineering scholarship

The Indiana Department of Transportation is accepting applications for the INDOT Engineering Scholarship.

 

The scholarships offer civil engineering students up to $3,125 per semester, and paid employment during summer breaks and upon graduation.

 

Students must be accepted or enrolled full time in one of Indiana’s accredited civil engineering schools and apply using the form at www.INDOTScholarship.IN.gov. Applications for the 2022-2023 school year must be submitted by December 31, 2021.

 

INDOT’s scholarship program offers $3,125 per semester or $2,083 per trimester for up to five years of post-secondary civil engineering education. Scholarship funds can be applied to educational expenses, fees, and books. In return, recipients will work for INDOT in full-time, paid positions during their summer breaks and upon graduation.

 

Students must be accepted or enrolled full time in one of Indiana’s Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) certified civil engineering programs. Eligible programs include Purdue University, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, Purdue University Fort Wayne, University of Southern Indiana, Trine University, Purdue University Northwest, University of Evansville, University of Notre Dame, and Valparaiso University.

 

Students or parents with questions may contact Talent Development Manager Adam Beasley at ABeasley2@indot.in.gov or 317-234-7930.


Wanted: Hunters to help hungry Hoosiers

According to Feeding America, approximately 883,260 Indiana residents regularly struggle with food insecurity – 274,080 of which are children. Food banks, pantries, and soup kitchens continue to work to protect the most vulnerable and under-served in our communities during these uncertain times.

 

Proper nutrition is vital to the growth and development of children and the health of all Hoosiers. That is why protein, an important component of every cell in the body and one of the most important nutrients for brain and body development, is so important. Sadly, it is also the hardest commodity for food banks to obtain, especially now.

 

Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry would like to remind ALL hunters and landowners about our deer donation program!  After you’ve filled your freezer, please help us to feed those in need in your area by donating to Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry’s “Meat” the Need initiative.  Just take your deer in to your local, participating meat processor and tell them you would like to donate it to Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry. There is NO charge to you! After being processed, your donation will be given to local hunger relief agencies.

 

The 2021-2022 deer hunting seasons are as follows:

Reduction Zone: Sept. 15, 2021-Jan. 31, 2022 (where open)

Youth Season: Sept. 25-26, 2021

Archery: Oct. 1, 2021-Jan. 2, 2022

Firearm: Nov. 13-28, 2021

Muzzleloader: Dec. 4-19, 2021

 

“We envision communities in which everyone has access to nutritious food – a basic human right. We are so grateful for all of our supporters who have helped us accomplish so very much over the years, helping to keep our mission of feeding our communities most vulnerable, going strong.” stated Deb Treesh, Hoosiers Feeding the Hungry Executive Director.

 

4-H Scholarship Application Time

Scholarship application season is starting up and College Goal Sunday is coming up on November 7. College Goal Sunday is between 2-4 pm at numerous Indiana locations and locally at Ivy Tech Greencastle. Families may obtain free help on completing the application. To find a checklist to be ready and complete the application at a host site, visit collegegoalsunday.org to find more info.

There are two very important features to being successful at receiving scholarships. The first is a “duh!” but seriously, one has to apply with a quality application! Too often scholarships go un-awarded due to no applicants or no applicants who followed instructions. In other instances, one could pay attention to detail with cover letters and power statements to out-compete a limited number of other applicants. Secondly power statements will be discussed to enhance applications.

There are many Indiana 4-H Foundation scholarships awarded each year. For information about these scholarships and the application process, go to https://extension.purdue.edu/4-H/get-involved/scholarships.html  to find requirements and eligibility. These scholarships are due January 25th and 4-Hers will use their 4honline account https://v2.4honline.com/ to submit applications. There are state wide competitive awards for youth in grades 10 through the year following high school. In coming weeks, we will discuss further the Putnam County focused scholarships. These include the Louis and Mary Luzar 4-H Scholarship Endowment (Senior Scholarship) of $1,000 for a current Putnam 4-H high school senior. Also, the Beverly Torr Memorial Scholarship (Senior Scholarship) set up for a 4-Her who excelled in the fashion revue or sewing project activity. The Putnam 4-H Junior Leader senior scholarship will also continue in 2022 availability.

The Putnam County 4-H Scholarships administered locally by the Putnam County Community Foundation (PCCF) can be applied for using the Putnam County Community Foundation website www.pcfoundation.org online application process. The PCCF application process will be available online starting Monday, November 1. The PCCF Putnam 4-H scholarships include the Brookshire 4-H Scholarship, the Darrel Thomas 4-H Scholarship, Putnam County 4-H Livestock Scholarship, and the Putnam County General 4-H Scholarship. Like all Putnam County Community Foundation scholarships, these are due January 21 at 5 pm uploaded online. These awards are typically between $750 to $1500, though the Putnam 4-H Council will be meeting in January to determine scholarship values based on earnings.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

November 2 – Reducing the Stress in Stress Management webinar, 12pm, register at
                        https://tinyurl.com/healthandwealthseries21

November 7 – Putnam 4-H Awards Program, 2 pm, Fairgrounds

November 10 – Kitchen Gadgets: Instant Pot & Air Fryer, 4:30pm, register at
                          https://tinyurl.com/healthandwealthseries21

November 11 – Extension Office closed for Veteran’s Day

November 15 – Diabetes & the Holidays, 10am, register at
                          https://tinyurl.com/healthandwealthseries21

November 16 – Digging Deeper Into Land Leases, 6:30 pm, virtual, $25, register at:
                          https://cvent.me/gmRR08

November 17 – Insights From Consumer Research That You Can Take Home To The
                          Farm webinar, 12 pm register at https://tinyurl.com/WIAWebinars21

November 17 – ServSafe 1-Day Class and Online Exam, 9am-4pm, register at
                          https://purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

November 18 - Digging Deeper Into Land Leases, 10:00 am, virtual, $25, register at:
                         https://cvent.me/gmRR08

November 22 – Curb the Urge to Splurge on Holiday Spending, 2pm, register at
                          https://tinyurl.com/healthandwealthseries21

November 22, 29 & Dec. 6, 13 – Know Your Numbers, Know Your Options, 10 am, virtual, $20, register at: https://cvent.me/n24R23

November 25-26 – Extension office closed for Thanksgiving Holiday

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