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Community News Archives for 2022-03

USDA encourages producers to enroll grasslands into special CRP signup

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) encourages producers and landowners to enroll in the Grassland Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) starting next week through May 13, 2022.  Grassland CRP provides a unique opportunity for farmers, ranchers, and agricultural landowners to keep land in agricultural production and supplement their income while improving their soils and permanent grass cover.   The program had its highest enrollment in history in 2021 and is part of the Biden-Harris Administration’s broader effort to equip producers with the tools they need to help address climate change and invest in the long-term health of our natural resources.

 

Grassland CRP is a federally funded voluntary working lands program. Through the program, USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) provides annual rental payments to landowners to maintain and conserve grasslands while allowing producers to graze, hay, and produce seed on that land.  Maintaining the existing permanent cover provides several benefits, including reducing erosion, providing wildlife habitat and migration corridors, and capturing and maintaining carbon in the soil and cover. 
 

“Grassland CRP is an important working lands conservation tool that offers a win-win to both our country’s producers and the environment by supporting and enabling grazing activities, while at the same time promoting plant and animal biodiversity and stemming rangeland conversion,” said Susan Houston, Acting FSA State Executive Director in Indiana. “We had a successful signup last year, and we look forward to broadening our base and working with new producers, particularly our historically underserved producers, to ensure they can access the program and its many benefits.”  

 

FSA provides participants with annual rental payments and cost-share assistance. The annual rental rate varies by county with a national minimum rental rate of $13 per acre for this signup. Contract duration is 10 or 15 years. 

 

Broadening Reach of Program 

 

As part of the Agency’s Justice40 efforts, producers and landowners who are historically underserved, including beginning farmers and military veterans, will receive 10 additional ranking points to enhance their offers. 

 

Additionally, USDA is working to broaden the scope and reach of Grassland CRP by leveraging the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program?(CREP) to engage historically underserved communities. CREP is a partnership program that enables states, Tribal governments, non-profit, and private entities to partner with FSA to implement CRP practices and address high priority conservation and environmental objectives. Interested entities are encouraged to contact FSA. 

 

More Information on CRP 

Landowners and producers interested in Grassland CRP should contact their local USDA Service Center to learn more or to apply for the program before the May 13 deadline.  Additionally, fact sheets and other resources are available atfsa.usda.gov/crp.

 

Signed into law in 1985, CRP is one of the largest voluntary private-lands conservation programs in the United States. The working lands signup announced today demonstrates how much it has evolved from the original program that was primarily intended to control soil erosion and only had the option to take enrolled land out of production. The program has expanded over the years and now supports a greater variety of conservation and wildlife benefits, along with the associated economic benefits.
 

USDA touches the lives of all Americans each day in so many positive ways. Under the Biden-Harris Administration, USDA is transforming America’s food system with a greater focus on more resilient local and regional food production, fairer markets for all producers, ensuring access to safe, healthy and nutritious food in all communities, building new markets and streams of income for farmers and producers using climate smart food and forestry practices, making historic investments in infrastructure and clean energy capabilities in rural America, and committing to equity across the Department by removing systemic barriers and building a workforce more representative of America. To learn more, visit usda.gov

4-H Summer Travel Opportunities

Thankfully it appears 2022 will be back to normal for state 4-H trips and camps. One of the most common remarks heard from current and former Putnam County 4-Hers is how awesome their camp experiences were while in the 4-H program or what a great experience to be on a college campus for science workshops. Most will make lifelong friends while participating in these experiences. Also, one may participate in one of these events to complete one’s 4-H experience or continue to achieve more in the program. There is no requirement to exhibit or do other 4-H activities if one solely wants to participate in a camp or state workshop.

Youth interested in camp must be in grades three through six as of January 1, 2022. Camp occurs at Shakamak State Park. Departure is noon, Wednesday, June 8th with a return of 11:00 am, Saturday, June 11th. Youth learn lifelong skills, have a great time swimming, and make new friends. The deadline for youth to enroll for camp is Friday, May 13th or as long as space is available. Registration must be submitted to the Purdue Extension-Putnam County office. Health forms must also be completed prior to departure. Camp registration forms are available on the 4-H page of the Purdue Extension Putnam County website. Thanks to TSC Paper Clover funds that help to offset some of the increases in costs. Camp will be $120 this year and include all meals, tshirt, lodging, etc.

Those interested in applying to be camp counselors must be enrolled in 4-H and be in at least 7th grade for consideration. Camp Counselor applications will be due Friday, April 15th to the Purdue Extension-Putnam County office. Training dates for counselors will be Thursday, May 5th and Thursday, May 12th where successful applicants must be present. Cost will be covered by the Diana Thomas Memorial Endowment for 4-H volunteer development. The health form and medicine form must be presented at departure.

Statewide summer events in 2022 are planned to occur in a more normal format.  4-H Academy, State 4-H Junior Leader Conference, 4-H Round-Up, 4-H Band and 4-H Chorus will be in June. Locally DePauw University will be hosting the state Junior Leader Conference on Tuesday, June 14 through Friday, June 17. The fabulous career and workforce programs of 4-H Academy for grades 9-12 will be June 8-10 and the 4-H Roundup for grades 7-9 will be June 20-22. If a 4-Her does not attend these two events at least once during a 4-H career, one is really missing out. In the 4-H Academy the aviation participants fly a plane and the first responders are very hands on with local hospitals and emergency first responders for example.

And finally, for those who would like to work in the Indiana State Fair 4-H Exhibit Hall having the opportunity of meeting other 4-Hers from around the state, these are paid opportunities to work during late July and August with the entry and display of 4-H projects at the Indiana State Fair. Contact the office if you are interested in this opportunity so we can get you the information. One is to sign up by April 15.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

March 31 – Exploring 4-H (mini 4-H Grade 2) program, Fairgrounds, 6 pm.

April 5 – Medicare and Diabetes, 3pm, Extension Office, free, register by April 1st at 765-653-8411

April 13 – ServSafe 1-Day Class & Online Exam, 9am-4pm, register at
      www.purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

April 14 – Spring Flowers, 2pm, Extension Office, virtual option available upon request, free, register by April 8th at 765-653-8411

April 14 – Backyard Poultry Biosecurity webinar, 12 Noon, Register at
      https://tinyurl.com/WIAPoultry  

April 20-June 8 – A Matter of Balance (Fall Prevention), 8-Wednesdays, 1-3:00pm, Roachdale Community & Senior Center, free, limited spots, register at 765-653-8411

 

 

Cloverdale JAG student earns Stamps Scholarship to Purdue University

Cloverdale High School Senior Tabiah Foster has been named one of the incoming Stamps Scholars at Purdue University, where she also will be a member of the Purdue Honors College.

 

The Stamps Scholars Program covers a student’s full cost of attendance (tuition, room, and board) and connects students with a national network of dedicated peers. With the support of benefactors E. Roe Stamps and his late wife Penny, the award also gives scholars access to an academic enrichment fund of up to $10,000 to finance activities such as academic conferences, study abroad experiences or internships.

 

Tabiah Foster also is a member of the Jobs for America’s Graduates (JAG) program, a national workforce skills readiness program for high school students. It focuses on the importance of earning a high school diploma to develop skills that include problem solving, leadership, job seeking, team building, and academic skills; all necessary to complete post-secondary training and success in today’s job market. 

While at Cloverdale, Tabiah’s JAG program has been led by specialist Karl Turk, who was recently recognized as the Putnam County Citizen of the Year by the Putnam County Chamber of Commerce.  

 

“We are so proud of Tabiah for securing such a prestigious scholarship, and are grateful to Karl Turk and the JAG program at Cloverdale High School for preparing our young people for the jobs of tomorrow,” said Greg Lee, who oversees nine JAG programs in western Indiana. “The JAG experience not only sets young people up for success after high school, it also teaches valuable personal and career skills they will carry with them throughout their lives.”  

 

Eligible students are automatically considered for the Stamps Scholarship upon applying to Purdue. Purdue Stamps Scholars demonstrate academic merit, strong leadership potential and exceptional character. The Stamps Scholars Program welcomes and supports students from all backgrounds and areas of study.

 

The Stamps Scholarship program was created by Penny and Roe Stamps, originally at the University of Michigan and Georgia Tech. It has since grown to award multi-year merit scholarships across the United States. 

Artists sought for the Putnam County Mural Project festival 

A new mural festival, organized by the Putnam County Mural Project, will be held in September, 2022 and it is seeking artists to complete murals at five locations around the county. Local, regional, and national artists are encouraged to apply by April 24.

 

The murals will need to be started in mid-September and complete by Sept. 24, 2022. The sizes of the walls range from 100 square feet to nearly 6,500 square feet and include locations in Fillmore, Greencastle and Roachdale. The full call for artists is available at www.putnamcountymuralproject.org

 

A committee will review the artists and chosen artists will be asked to work with the Putnam County Mural Project team in order to produce work that is reflective of and responsive to the Putnam County community.

 

“We’re excited to build upon the success of our first project that brought in an internationally-recognized artist, generated national attention, and created a meaningful experience for Putnam County residents,” said Chris Flegal, leader of the volunteer group. “Our new mural festival format will allow us to engage several artists, expand our community-arts assets, and activate spaces around the entire county.”

 

The mural locations will include the Banner-Graphic building and Putnam County Visitors Center in Greencastle, Off the Rails alleyway and Community Park building in Roachdale, and Tom’s Cookies in Fillmore.

Roachdale Town Council holding special meeting for wastewater project

The Roachdale Town Council will hold a special meeting on Wednesday, March 30, 2022 at 5:30 pm at the Roachdale Community Building. This meeting is a public hearing for a proposed wastewater project as well as any new business that comes before the Council.

Roachdale Police Department to host FREE movie night to celebrate spring break.

Join the Roachdale Police Department at the Roachdale Community Center, 204 North Indiana Street, on Saturday, March 26, at 7:00 PM for a free movie night. The movie being shown will be Disney's Encanto, which is rated PG.

 

Free popcorn and drinks will be included. However, participants are reminded to bring their own blankets and / or chairs.

 

Controlling crab grass in home lawns

Crabgrass is probably one of the most hated weeds around Indiana. It is a summer annual weed that germinates when soil temperatures are around 60 degrees Fahrenheit. It is a grass weed that emerges from the ground with a single blade at first and has a fibrous root system. Due to how annoying it can be, it is important you understand the various ways to control it from overtaking your lawn.

One of the best ways to control crabgrass is with a dense, healthy lawn. You can do this by maintaining a lawn that is about 3 inches high. When you mow too short, you promote an environment for crabgrass to thrive in. Additionally, you should apply between 2 and 4 pounds of nitrogen per 1,000 square feet each year. You should apply the nitrogen in two applications in the fall. It is important to realize it can be hard to get a dense, healthy lawn, especially in years of severe weather conditions.

To control crabgrass when your lawn is thin or new, you will have to combine cultural control with herbicide usage. Preemergence herbicides prevent the emergence of crabgrass and often need to be applied before the middle of April. Michigan State University has a Growing Degree Days Tracker (https://gddtracker.msu.edu/?model=7&offset=0&zip=46135) that allows you to know when is the most optimum time to treat for crabgrass based on your zip code and weather.  According to this tracker, we were just starting enter the most optimum time to treat via preemergent herbicide on March 16, 2022. Most likely, you will only be able to find preemergence herbicides that have fertilizers mixed in it. If you use a preemergence herbicide that is a “weed and feed” product, try to find one that has most of the nitrogen in a slow release format. If you have recently seeded your lawn, do not use a preemergence herbicide.

Postemergence herbicides are used once the crabgrass has emerged from the soil. However, they are only effective if the plant is small. Postemergence herbicides are more difficult to use and tend not to be as effective as preemergence herbicides on crabgrass. If you have not gotten your crabgrass under control by the middle of July, do not waste your time using a herbicide. By July it is too late to control crabgrass and you should just let it grow. It will eventually die when the first frost hits.

If you do use a herbicide on your lawn, please take the time to look at the product label. The label will tell you how to mix the product, use the product, and what safety precautions to take when using the product. It is against the law to use any herbicide product in a manner that is not stated on the label.

No matter how hard you try to prevent and eliminate crabgrass, your fight might not be successful. If you would like more information about crabgrass, look at Purdue Extension publication, Control of Crabgrass in Home Lawns. You can obtain your own copy by going to http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/AY/AY-10-W.pdf or by contacting your local Purdue Extension Office. This publication lists some of the active ingredients to look for when selecting a herbicide to use in your fight against crabgrass.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local

Purdue Extension Office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution. All times listed are Eastern Time.

 

Upcoming Events:

April 4, 11, 18 & 25 – Be Heart Smart, 5pm, virtual, $5, register by March 25th at 765-653-8411

April 5 – Medicare and Diabetes, 3pm, Extension Office, virtual option available upon
   request, free, register by April 1st at 765-653-8411

April 13 – ServSafe 1-Day Class & Online Exam, 9am-4pm, register at
      www.purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

April 14 – Backyard Poultry Biosecurity webinar, 12 Noon, Register at
     https://tinyurl.com/WIAPoultry  

April 14 – Spring Flowers, 2pm, Extension Office, virtual option available upon request,
     free, register by April 8th at 765-653-8411

April 20-June 8 – A Matter of Balance (Fall Prevention), 8-Wednesdays, 1-3:00pm,   
   Roachdale Community & Senior Center, free, limited spots, register at
   765-653-8411

Sheep checkoff calls for nominations in Putnam, surrounding counties, approves projects

At their latest meeting, the Indiana Sheep and Wool Market Development Council (IN S&W) approved three new projects to fund during the spring and summer seasons. Additionally, the council is asking for nominations of individuals for board positions of districts 1, 4 and 7.

 

In compliance with IN S&W’s regulation to hold elections for three council members each year on a rolling basis, the organization is looking for representatives from the following districts:

 

* District 1: Consisting of Porter, Lake, Jasper, Laporte, St. Joseph, Marshall, Fulton, Stark, Pulaski and Newton counties.

* District 4: Consisting of Benton, White, Warren, Tippecanoe, Fountain, Montgomery, Vermillion and Parke counties.

* District 7: Consisting of Marion, Hancock, Rush, Shelby, Morgan, Johnson, Hendricks and Putnam counties.

 

Anyone interested in becoming district representative or in nominating someone for a district representative position should contact IN S&W Purdue adviser Meredith Cobb at 765-426-1195 or mcobb2@purdue.edu by April 1. There is also a fillable form on the website to sign up to be included in all mailings and emails related to the checkoff, along with an option to submit your name for nomination in the upcoming election.

 

At the most recent meeting of the IN S&W Council, three new projects were accepted for funding. These include a sheep shearing contest at the Indiana State Fair, funding for the Indiana Sheep Association’s 2022 Symposium and the 2022 Indiana Make it With Wool (MIWW) Competition. In January, a contestant from Indiana earned fourth place overall at the National MIWW competition in San Diego.

Putnam County StoryWalk® project unveils fourth StoryWalk® installation at Heritage Lake

A new StoryWalk® installation is coming to Putnam County. Soon families and children will be able to jointly enjoy a story and the great outdoors, this time in Heritage Lake.

 

The Heritage Lake Community StoryWalk® will open on April 8. The installation is located at the playground near the Heritage Lake Marina and Sahm’s Haven restaurant.

 

StoryWalks® are an innovative and delightful way for children — and adults — to enjoy reading and the outdoors at the same time. Laminated pages from a children's book are placed in metal displays, which are installed along an outdoor path. As you stroll down the trail, you're directed to the next page in the story.

 

StoryWalk® was created by Anne Ferguson of Montpelier, VT and developed with the help of Rachel Senechal, formerly of the Kellogg-Hubbard Library.

 

In late 2020, the Putnam County StoryWalk Project was created as a coalition of local organizations interested in seeing StoryWalks® placed throughout Putnam County. The PCSP comprises many partners, including the Putnam County Public Library, Purdue Extension-Putnam County, Putnam County Community Foundation, and many more.

 

The Heritage Lake Community StoryWalk® was funded through a generous grant from the Putnam County Community Foundation and additional support from Property Manager Ken Rozelle and the Heritage Lake Property Owners Association. The PCCF additionally funded the Reelsville and Roachdale Community StoryWalks®.

 

“We are incredibly grateful to the PCCF for helping us make this dream a reality,” said Youth Services Manager Krista Mullinnix. “StoryWalks bring the books that children love into their communities. We are so excited to hear from families who have visited these locations and enjoyed the stories.”  

 

Combining play with learning, StoryWalks® are an important early literacy tool for Putnam County children. The Putnam County Public Library will trade out books seasonally, so there are new stories to enjoy throughout the year. StoryWalks® are also a way for families, children, and adults to enjoy the outdoors while also enjoying a story.

 

“Now that spring is here, We are really excited to open our fourth Storywalk installation for children across Putnam County to enjoy,” said Library Director Matt McClelland. “However, the work is only beginning. The library and our community partners would like to extend an open request for donations of either time or funding to ensure this project can continue for many years to come.”

 

To get involved with the Putnam County StoryWalk project, please contact the library at director@pcpl21.org.

 

To enjoy even more stories and parks, visit the Edgar and Betty Bayliff StoryWalk® at the Cloverdale Community Park, the Reelsville Community StoryWalk® at the Reelsville Community Center and Ball Diamonds and the Roachdale Community StoryWalk® at Roachdale Elementary.

 

For more information about library services, programs, and collections, please call us at 765-653-2755 or visit pcpl21.org. The library is open Monday through Thursday from 9-8 p.m. and Friday through Saturday from 9-5 p.m. The library is closed on Sundays.

AMERICAN PICKERS to film in Indiana

The American Pickers are excited to return to Indiana! They plan to film episodes of The History Channel hit television series in May 2022.
 

AMERICAN PICKERS is a documentary series that explores the fascinating world of antique “picking” on The History Channel. The hit show follows skilled pickers in the business, as they hunt for America’s most valuable antiques. They are always excited to find sizeable, unique collections and learn the interesting stories behind them.
 

As they hit the back roads from coast to coast, the Pickers are on a mission to recycle and rescue forgotten relics. Along the way, they want to meet characters with remarkable and exceptional items. They hope to give historically significant objects a new lease on life while learning a thing or two about America’s past along the way. The Pickers have seen a lot of rusty gold over the years and are always looking to discover something they’ve never seen before. They are ready to find extraordinary items and hear fascinating tales about them.
 

We at American Pickers continue to take the pandemic very seriously and will be following all guidelines and protocols for safe filming outlined by the state and CDC. Nevertheless, we are excited to continue reaching the many collectors in the area to discuss their years of picking and are eager to hear their memorable stories!
 

The American Pickers TV Show is looking for leads and would love to explore your hidden treasure. If you or someone you know has a large, private collection or accumulation of antiques that the Pickers can spend the better part of the day looking through, send us your name, phone number, location, and description of the collection with photos to: americanpickers@cineflix.com or call (646) 493-2184, or through Facebook: @GotAPick .

 

Be Heart Smart

As the leading cause of death for all Americans, heart disease claims 600,000 lives annually. Many in our community know someone that has been affected by heart disease. It is always the right time to learn more about how you can help fight this disease and make heart-smart choices.

Purdue Extension in Putnam County will be having an opportunity to learn more and to help prevent heart disease, or manage the condition to have better over health. For example, in this program, one topic that is discussed is how sodium affects your heart. Participants will learn about how when there is extra sodium in the bloodstream, water is pulled into the blood vessels, which increases the total amount of blood inside of them. This is how and why blood pressure can increase. Join this program to learn about the recommended amounts of sodium one should consume each day, and what foods to avoid or limit to aid in a heart healthy diet.

This program is a series of four heart-health classes intended to help you and your loved ones learn more about heart disease. You will learn more about:

  • Identifying and understanding risk factors for heart disease;
  • Guidelines for healthy cholesterol and blood pressure;
  • A heart-healthy eating plan, including a cooking demonstration;
  • Techniques for stress reduction;
  • Best practices for talking to healthcare providers

The Be Heart Smart program will meet on four Monday nights: April 4, 11, 18 and 25th from 5 to 6 p.m. on Zoom through Purdue Extension-Putnam County. There is a $5 fee to participate in the program. All participants will be given printed materials for the program.

For more information about classes or to register, call Abbi Sampson at 765-653-8411 or email sampsona@purdue.edu. If accommodations are needed, please contact Abbi Sampson.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

March 19 – Garden Fair, 9am-3pm, free, Fairgrounds

April 4, 11, 18 & 25 – Be Heart Smart, 5pm, virtual, $5, register by March 25th at 765-653-8411

April 13 – ServSafe 1-Day Class & Online Exam, 9am-4pm, register at www.purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

April 5 – Medicare and Diabetes, 3pm, Extension Office, virtual option available upon request, free, register by April 1st at 765-653-8411

April 14 – Spring Flowers, 2pm, Extension Office, virtual option available upon request, free, register by April 8th at 765-653-8411

April 20-June 8 – A Matter of Balance (Fall Prevention), 8-Wednesdays, 1-3:00pm, Roachdale Community & Senior Center, free, limited spots, register at 765-653-8411

 

 

Scramble animal program and YQCA changes

One program that many may not be aware of is that 4-Hers who want to experience an animal project in sheep, goat, swine, or dairy steer may try out this project by receiving a scramble (donated) animal for that particular species. This is typically a youth who is in grade 3, 4 or 5 who wants to try the particular species animal project. Certain criteria apply like having the necessary facility to care for the animal and one may only have one scramble animal in any given year. The intent is to help build interest in youth to show a particular species and learn from the project experience. Contact the Extension office (info below) if you would like to know more or sign up and we will let the respective species superintendent know of your interest.

4-Hers exhibiting any beef, dairy, goats, poultry, rabbits, sheep, and swine must complete the Youth Quality Care of Animals (YQCA) to exhibit these species of livestock. The YQCA is a quality assurance program similar to Junior Pork Quality Assurance (JPQA) program that swine members had completed for many years in order to be allowed to sell swine.

What is the YQCA? It is a one-hour program that must be taught by a certified Extension, FFA Advisor, or veterinarian or it may be completed online. Face to face advisor meetings will cost $3 while the online programs will cost $12. The fees are completely handled online with the YQCA registration website via credit card. The local Extension office has obtained a few coupon codes for those who do not have access to a credit or debit card for payment.

Emails/texts are being sent to all livestock members to provide details of an unfortunate disruption that state and county 4-H staff have recently learned of that will be occurring with the program later in March. The March YQCA program for Putnam County is being cancelled due to this disruption as well. The YQCA web platform is changing and the result is that info on previous platform will not carry over to the new platform.

For those who have already completed the program this year, by March 21, please print your certificate to have with you when you attend shows. This can be as simple as having an electronic screen shot on your phone or other device. If you have signed up for a program, you will need to cancel your signup and be refunded your $3 fee by March 21. Later individuals will signup with the new platform. The following outlines the cancelation process:

  1. Go to https://yqca.learngrow.io 
  2. Login to the youth's account 
  3. Click on the registered course - you may have to complete the Metrics – Program & species questionnaire 
  4. You will have an option to "Cancel Registration" - which will cancel the training and refund the payment. 
  5. Details will come later regarding how to signup for a future program using the new platform.

Indiana 4-H like many other states have adopted this program to help ensure food safety and proper animal care educational awareness. One may also complete the certification in another county. The certification is not species specific, meaning you only need to complete it once annually despite the fact one may exhibit multiple species.

One can still sign up for 4-H using https://v2.4honline.com/#/user/sign-in to enroll. Except at this point, horse & pony, archery and dog are closed. If you have questions about Putnam County 4-H, contact Mark Evans, 4-H Youth Development Extension Educator, Kim Beadles, Education Program Coordinator or Kristy Straziscar, Office Manager for help.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

March 12 – Putnam County Ag Day (Breakfast and Mini Farm Fest) Fairgrounds, 8 am.

March 31 – Exploring 4-H (mini 4-H Grade 2) program, Fairgrounds, 6 pm.

April 5 – Medicare and Diabetes, 3pm, Extension Office, free, register by April 1st at 765-653-8411

April 14 – Spring Flowers, 2pm, Extension Office, virtual option available upon request, free, register by April 8th at 765-653-8411

April 20-June 8 – A Matter of Balance (Fall Prevention), 8-Wednesdays, 1-3:00pm, Roachdale Community & Senior Center, free, limited spots, register at 765-653-8411

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