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Community News Archives for 2022-09

Oktoberfest is Saturday

Sponsored by the Knights of Columbus, St. Paul’s Catholic Church (202 E Washington St. Greencastle, IN) is Oktoberfest on Saturday, October 1, from 3:00 PM to 10:00 PM.

 

This is a family friendly event, open to the public.

 

The event will have kids’ activities from 3:00 PM to 8:00 PM, including bounce house, games, and prizes. Adults can enjoy a variety of craft and domestic beer, as well as wine. Guests can also enjoy food (much of it from Myers Market), bingo, number wheel, poker booth, pull tabs, and a robust raffle.

 

Prizes for the raffle include:

  • $50 Marvin’s Restaurant Gift Card
  • $50 Bainbridge Dari-Ette Gift Card
  • $50 Almost Home Restaurant Gift Card
  • $50 Gift Card - The Fluttering Duck Restaurant or 2 West Restaurant-The Inn at DePauw
  • $50 Taco Wapo Restaurant Gift Card
  • $50 Breadworks Restaurant Gift Card
  • $75 Putnam Inn Restaurant Gift Card
  • Clover Meadows Golf Course, Cloverdale, IN – Twosome for Golf – 18 Holes with Cart
  • Oak Ridge Golf Course, Brazil, IN – Foursome for Golf – 18 Holes with Cart
  • Hopwood Cellars Winery, Zionsville, IN – Gift Certificate for Wine Tasting - 8 People
  • A Day at The Lake-Iron Horse Lake (Keith & Lori Johnson) - Water Fun for the Family
  • Bridgewater Golf Club, Carmel, IN – Twosome for Golf – 18 Holes with Cart
  • Indiana University Basketball – 2 Tickets (Game TBA)
  • Holiday World & Splashin’ Safari – 2 One-Day Passes
  • Stables Steakhouse, Terre Haute, IN – Gift Certificate
  • $100 Myers’ Market Gift Card
  • $100 Cash (2 of these, separate drawings) 
  • French Lick Resort – 1 Night Stay for 2 People & Twosome for Golf at Donald Ross Course
  • Indianapolis Colts – 4 Tickets (Lower Level)                                               

5K event to benefit Faith Learning Preschool Academy

On your mark, get set, go. 

 

The time is near to grab your favorite super hero costume and your walking or running shoes, as the Faith Learning Academy 5K Run/Walk and kids fun run event is rapidly approaching. 

 

The event, which will be held Oct. 1 at Greencastle Presbyterian Church, 653 South Country Road 100 East, will begin at 9 a.m. with participants dressed as their favorite superheroes. 

 

And for Tonya Donaldson, owner of the Faith Learning Academy Preschool, this marks the fourth 5k event that she will have sponsored with Faith Learning Academy after moving to Putnam County from Vincennes in August. 

 

"The costume idea came with being close to Halloween, as well as a fun idea for the kids and adults too. I’ve done different themed runs in the past but this is the first superhero," Donaldson told The Putnam County Post. 

 

Funds raised will go to help the Faith Learning Academy, which is new to the county and helps students prepare for kindergarten while operating as a not for profit preschool ministry. 

 

"The funds from this race will go towards a tuition assistance program for families needing assistance as well as special events for the current class this year," Donaldson said. 

 

Awards will be given to overall male and female winners, along with age group winners. T-shirts are available on race day as a first come, first served basis. The price is $25 for the 5k run/walk and $15 for the kids fun run, which is open to children ages 10 and under.

 

The deadline to register is Sept. 30 at 11:59 p.m. and those interested in participating can register at https://runsignup.com/Race/IN/Greencastle/FaithLearningAcademySuperhero5KRunWalk

 

 

 


Richard O'Brien's: The Rocky Horror Show playing at Moore Theater, Green Center for Performing Arts

In this cult classic, sweethearts Brad and Janet, stuck with a flat tire during a storm, discover the eerie mansion of Dr. Frank-N-Furter. As their innocence is lost, Brad and Janet meet a houseful of wild characters, including a rocking biker and a creepy butler. Through elaborate dances and rock songs, Frank-N-Furter unveils his latest creation: a muscular man named "Rocky."

 

Audience participation is encouraged. We welcome all patrons to wear their finest Rocky Horror attire, purchase our audience participation kit, and indulge in a few pre-show games! Our audience participation kit will have you throwing toilet paper at Rocky, aiming squirt guns at Brad and Janet, and making noise with the Transylvanians. Kits are $2 a piece, cash only.

 

Saturday night features a late showing perfect for all creatures of the night. It’s sure to be a fun and rowdy experience! Please note this production features themes that might not be suitable for all audiences. Viewer discretion is advised.

 

DePauw Theatre’s next production is Jeffrey Hatcher’s Scotland Road, a suspenseful psychodrama centered around the aftermath of the Titanic; running November 10-13, 2022.

 

CAST:

Usherette: Madalyn Sailors

Brad: Cole Stephen

Janet: Kelli O’Neil

Narrator: Ashley Carrasquillo

Riff Raff: Eli Grey-Nations

Magenta: Liz Davis

Columbia: Macie Barker

Frank ‘N’ Furter: Skylar Niles

Rocky: Ben Freeman

Eddie: Eli Widmer

Dr. Scott: Dave Worthington

 

Ensemble: Susan Anthony, Landen Branford, Amélie Doneff, Barbara Fields Timm,

Lydia Foreman, Deborah Grammel, Carly Hajdukcy, Madeline Humphreys, Rebecca

Jackson, Kevin Kinney, Imani Luellen, Harriet Moore, Colleen McCracken Renick,

Emma Merkamp, Chi Pham, Jenna Reynolds, Sarah Ryan, Madalyn Sailors, Misti Scott, Tamara L. Stasik, Katie Steele, Karen Sutherlin, Lilly VanHouten, Sarah Weeks, Heather Wright, Eihi Yoshinaga, and Axel Zartman

 

PRODUCTION TEAM:

Steve Timm, Director

Anne Washington, Costume Designer

Jaye Beetem, Lighting Designer

Rick Provine, Music Director

Kate Grimm, Production Stage Manager

Kathryn Dory, Vocal Coach

Emma Merkamp, Choreographer

Rhea J., Assistant Director

Dominick Willis, Assistant Stage Manager

 

BAND:

Veronica Pejril, Keyboard

Rick Provine, Drums

Steve Michael, Guitar

Bill Hamm, Bass

Levi Stewart, Saxophone

Teresa Shunk, Piano

 

LINKS: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-rocky-horror-show-tickets-406366712777

TICKETS: Free for students, $10 General Admission. Box Office is open 90 minutes before the show. Or you can get tickets online at dpugreencenter.eventbrite.com.

TIME & LOCATION: Moore Theater, Green Center for the Performing Arts, 600 S. Locust St., Greencastle, IN 46135

Thursday, September 29 at 7:30 PM

Friday, September 30 at 7:30 PM

Saturday, October 1 at 10:00 PM

Sunday, October 2 at 3:00 PM

Land lease agreements

A few weeks ago, we discussed the 2022 Purdue Farmland Value Survey and how to set a cash lease amount. As a reminder, the values and information found within the survey should be adjusted for your individual situation when determining your rental amount.

Setting the rental amount is just one of the components of leasing farmland that can be stressful. You can avoid some of the stress by putting your farmland lease in writing. By taking the time to write down the lease, you are able to get your thoughts down on paper so that you can make a clearer decision. Additionally, it gives you a record to go back to if a disagreement arises. It also serves as legal proof of your agreement and provides a way for your asset to be handled in the event that a tragedy would strike and your heirs are left with crops growing in the field. It is best when the lease is being written for the landlord, tenant, and a notary or witness to be present.

There are many types of leases; however, most are either cash rent agreements or a flexible lease. Cash rent leases typically involve one payment that is due at planting time or after harvest. The advantage of cash rent is the landlord gets a stable income and the tenant has total management control. The downfall for the landlord is they do not get the benefits of a good year while the tenant is faced with having to provide all the capital.

Flexible leases take into consideration fluctuating markets and uncertain yields by not determining rent until after harvest. The formula to determine the amount of income the landlord receives is determined at the time the lease is being developed, so there is some price risk for the landlord since they will not know until the end of the year what they will receive as income. One advantage is the benefits of a good year are often shared between landlord and tenant.

Having a good landlord-tenant relationship is necessary when it comes time to negotiate the lease. Therefore, as a tenant, I suggest talking to your landlord throughout the year and letting them know what you have been up to on their property. Specifically, letting them know what the yields were like and the results of any soil test.

A good landlord-tenant relationship makes it easier to talk about the fine points within a farmland lease. Many tend to group the items in a farmland lease into five areas: General Terms, Land Use & Cropping Program, Landlord’s Rights, Tenant’s Rights, and Enforcement of Agreements & Arbitration. The General Terms section states the length of the lease, rental amounts/share & contribution totals, how the rent will be paid, and how termination of the lease notice needs to be given. It is also good to declare in this section that this is an agreement, not a partnership.

Under the Land Use & Cropping Program section, you should find information about the acres involved, any limitation on what crops can be produced, and government program provisions. It should also declare who has hunting rights and who can give those hunting rights to others (i.e. if the tenant has the rights, can they let their nephew or son hunt there).

In the Landlord’s Rights section, there should be information on the landlord’s involvement in management decisions, who is in charge of replacing and repairing buildings, and who is to pay the taxes. Sometimes you will see information on whether or not the landlord pays for the lime applied to the field. 

Under the Tenant’s Right section, you will often find information on their responsibility to maintain the appearance of the farm (i.e. what if the fence gets destroyed) and storage/use of pesticide and other chemicals. Additionally, you will find information on subleasing possibilities, who is responsible for controlling soil erosion, and if the tenant can use cover crops on the property.

The Enforcement of Agreements & Arbitration section deals with the liability of damages to the other party and legal issues about who is to handle the crop if a tragedy strikes (i.e. can the lease be inherited or is it terminated). There should also be information on how to handle amendments to the lease and how to resolve disputes. If the tenant is responsible for the lime cost, then an agreement needs to be determined and written in this part of the lease on how to handle residual lime payments if the lease is terminated before all the benefits of the lime application is realized.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local Purdue Extension Office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution. All times listed are Eastern Time.

Upcoming Events:

Sept. 27 – Train your Brain program, 6:00pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

Oct. 3 – Pond Management Workshop, 6 pm, Ivy Tech, register at https://tinyurl.com/PutCoPond or 765-653-8411

Oct. 10 – Extension Office closed Columbus Day holiday


Department of Agriculture warns of harvest traffic on rural roads

Harvest season is here, and Lt. Gov. Suzanne CrouchIndiana State Department of Agriculture (ISDA) Director Bruce Kettler, Hoosier Ag Today and many other state agencies have teamed up to promote roadway safety this fall encouraging motorists to watch out and slow down for farm equipment on rural roads this harvest season. 

 

Lt. Gov. Crouch, as Indiana's Secretary of Agriculture, is a staunch supporter of Hoosier farmers and wants to ensure everyone gets home to their families safely. 

 

“There is nothing more beautiful than rural Indiana in the fall,” said Lt. Gov. Crouch. “But, with that beauty comes heightened roadway dangers during harvest season. I am encouraging all Hoosiers to be alert and be patient on rural roads this harvest season.”

 

In 2020 three vehicles were involved in crashes with farm equipment in Indiana which resulted in two deaths, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

 

“Rural road safety is something we all take very seriously. Each year Hoosiers lose their lives unnecessarily,” said Bruce Kettler, Indiana State Department of Agriculture director. “I want to continue to encourage roadway safety for motorists and for farmers. These accidents can be prevented if we all slow down and use caution around farm equipment this fall.”  

 

Farm equipment during harvest season could include tractors, combines, grain carts, grain wagons and large trucks hauling agricultural products. These vehicles are wide, sometimes taking up most of the road, and often travel at speeds no greater than 25 mph.

 

The following list includes several safety tips for motorists approaching large farm equipment:

 

  • Farmers will pull over when they are able to let motorists pass, but it may take time for them to get to a safe place to do so.
  • Be patient. Farm equipment is wide, sometimes taking up most of the road.
  • Be careful when passing. Do not pass in a designated “No Passing Zone” or within 100 feet of any intersection, railroad grade crossing, bridge, elevation structure or tunnel.
  • Do not try to pass a slow-moving vehicle on the left without ensuring that the vehicle is not planning a left turn. It may appear that the driver is pulling over for you to pass when it is actually preparing to turn. You will drive right into its path, endangering yourself and the farmer.
  • Please be aware of farmers working near the road and semi trucks and trailers parked alongside rural roads. 
  • Avoid tailgating, as some farm equipment might have to make sudden stops along the road.
  • Allow plenty of time to get to a destination, be aware of alternate routes and avoid distractions.

“Despite encouraging motorists and farmers alike to take extra precaution on roadways during harvest season, crashes still occur every year,” said Doug Carter, Indiana State Police Superintendent. “One death is one too many. I want to remind everyone to remain alert and exercise caution as you travel on Indiana’s rural roads this fall.”


Keeping "bagged" lunches safe

Whether it's off to school or work, millions of Americans carry "bag" lunches. Food brought from home can be kept safe if it is first handled and cooked properly. Then, perishable food must be kept cold while commuting via bus, bicycle, on foot, or in a car. After arriving at school or work, perishable food must be kept cold until lunchtime.

 

Why keep food cold? Harmful bacteria multiply rapidly in the “Danger Zone,” the temperatures between 40 and 140 °F. So, perishable food transported without an ice source won't stay safe long. Here are safe handling recommendations to prevent foodborne illness from "bag" lunches.

 

Begin with Safe Food: Perishable food (refrigerated), including meat, poultry and eggs, must be kept cold at all times. In between store and home, transport perishable food as fast as possible when no ice source is available. At home, refrigerate perishables promptly. Food should not be left out at room temperature more than 2 hours — 1 hour if the temperature is above 90 °F.

 

Don't Cross-Contaminate: Harmful bacteria can spread throughout the kitchen and get onto cutting boards, utensils, and countertops. Always use a clean cutting board. Consider using one cutting board for fresh produce and a separate one for meat and poultry.

 

Packing Lunches: Pack just the amount of perishable food that can be eaten at lunchtime. That way, there won't be a problem about the storage or safety of leftovers. It's fine to prepare the food the night before, but pack lunch bags right before leaving home. Insulated, soft-sided lunch boxes or bags are best for keeping food cold, but pack at least two ice sources with perishable food in any type of lunch bag or box you use.

 

Keeping Cold Lunches Cold: Prepare cooked food, such as turkey, ham, chicken, and vegetable or pasta salads, ahead of time to allow for thorough chilling in the refrigerator (40 °F or below). Keep cooked food refrigerated until time to leave home.

 

To keep lunches cold away from home, include at least two cold sources. You can use two frozen gel packs or combine a frozen gel pack with a frozen juice box or frozen bottle of water. Freeze gel packs overnight. When packing your bag lunch, place them on top and bottom of the perishable food items to keep them cold. Of course, if there's a refrigerator available at work or school, store perishable items there upon arrival.

 

Some food is safe without a cold source. Items that don't require refrigeration include whole fruits and vegetables, hard cheese, canned meat and fish, chips, breads, crackers, popcorn, peanut butter, jelly, mustard, and pickles.

 

Keeping Hot Lunches Hot: Use an insulated container to keep food like soup, and chili hot. Fill the container with boiling water, let stand for a few minutes, empty, and then put in the hot food. Keep the insulated container closed until lunchtime to keep the food hot (140 °F or above).

 

Source: USDA-Food Safety and Inspection Service

 

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

Upcoming Events

Sept. 22, 29 & Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27 – Fall Walking group, 9:00am, Big Walnut Sports Park

Sept. 21 – Garden Manure Pollinators & More, 6:00 pm, DePauw University Ullem Campus Farm, Register at https://tinyurl.com/PHISH22

Sept. 26 – Invasive Species Virtual Series, 6:30-8:30 pm, $10, Register by calling 812-462-3371

Sept. 27 – Train your Brain program, 6:00pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

Oct. 10 – Extension Office closed Columbus Day holiday

Putnam County Center for Women's Ministries (CWM) holding last yard/book sale, September 24, 2022

The Putnam County Center for Women’s Ministries (CWM) will hold a yard/book sale, September 24, 2022, 9:00 AM to 2:00 PM, in the Center (located at 404 N. Main Street, Cloverdale - just north of the Family Dollar store). The sale will be held rain or shine in the basement area of the building.


There will be a variety of clothing, household items, and books for all ages. Proceeds from the sale are used to support the ministry.


CWM offers hope to hurting women through free peer counseling for emotional and spiritual healing. Women who need comfort and encouragement will find a safe place where trained volunteers offer compassionate listening and encouragement through counseling, Bible studies, support groups, and prayer.


For more information about the services offered at the Putnam County Center, please call 765-795-6774 or email: putnamcwm@gmail.com.


National 4-H Week and Paper Clover Campaign

For the 79th consecutive year, millions of youths, parents, volunteers and alumni across the country will celebrate National 4-H Week from October 2-8. This year's theme, Opportunity 4All, is a campaign that will bring awareness to the importance that all youth have access to programs in a safe environment with a caring adult to build life skills. Youth success time and again has as a number one criterion for youth to have a caring adult who continually invests in their livelihood. In 4-H we believe in the power of youth and see that every child has valuable strengths and real influence to improve the world around us. Our 4-H volunteers in some cases may be the primary caring adult for a child empowering the child to have awareness of their value, strengths and influence.

4-H was founded on the belief that when kids are empowered to pursue their passions and chart their own course, their unique skills grow and take shape, helping them to become true leaders in their lives, careers and communities. As an early kickoff to National 4-H Week, the local program plans to have a presence at the First Friday event on October 7 on the courthouse square. Come out and see us!

Once again, the 4-H enrollment window for all of Indiana’s grade 3-12 youth will occur between October 1 and January 15 to assure the availability of all project activities. One may enroll by going to https://v2.4honline.com/#/user/sign-in and additional information will be posted during the month on the local Purdue Extension Putnam County website. Specific exhibit details will be provided by January. Additionally, Extension staff plan to conduct school visits to all third-grade classrooms throughout the county in October and November.

Also, in conjunction with National 4-H Week, like all Tractor Supply Stores (TSC), locally the TSC store will host the Fall Paper Clover event in the store and online during October 5th through October 16th! The Putnam 4-H program thanks the local store management for this ongoing promotion since 2010 and the funds that support local 4-H youth! Customers for $1 may purchase a paper clover and place names, etc. on the clover to be posted in the store. As a reminder, 90% of the funds raised are returned to the local 4-H program to support youth/teen participation in leadership or camping opportunities. These include Teens as Teacher training, 4-H Camp, 4-H Roundup, 4-H Academy and other statewide 4-H activities and can include transportation expenses.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming events

Sept. 9, 15, 22, 29 & Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27, Fall Walking group, 9:00am, Big Walnut Sports Park

Sept. 21 – Garden Manure Pollinators & More, 6:00 pm, DePauw University Ullem Campus
                  Farm, Register at https://tinyurl.com/PHISH22

Sept. 26 – Invasive Species Virtual Series, 6:30-8:30 pm, $10, Register by calling
                 812-462-3371

Sept. 27 – Train your Brain program, 6:00pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

Oct. 10 – Extension Office closed Columbus Day holiday

Area food pantries receive Duke Energy grants

The Duke Energy Foundation is awarding nearly $100,000 in grants to local food pantries and community organizations to help put food on the table for Hoosier families in need.

 

The grants will support the purchase of canned goods, fresh produce and essential supplies to address food insecurity across the company’s Indiana service territory.
 

“Food is the most basic of needs, and there are organizations throughout the state that provide a lifeline to Hoosiers who may not know where their next meal will come from,” said Stan Pinegar, president of Duke Energy Indiana. “They fill a vital role in the communities we serve, and we’re committed to supporting their work to help increase food access for those in need.”
 

Among the organizations awarded grants:
? Churches in Mission (Morgan County) – $1,000


? Clay County YMCA (Clay County) – $10,000


? Hendricks County Food Pantry Coalition (Hendricks County) – $5,000
 

 


Gov. Holcomb directs flags to be flown at half-staff in honor of Queen Elizabeth II

Governor Eric J. Holcomb is directing flags in the State of Indiana to be flown at half-staff in honor and remembrance of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II.

 

Per President Biden's order, flags should be flown at half-staff immediately until sunset on the day of interment. Gov. Holcomb is asking businesses and residents in Indiana to lower their flags.

Shred documents during two-hour event Saturday at the Putnam County Fairgrounds

Got papers, documents, tax returns, etc., that you want to get rid of safely?

 

An opportunity comes this Saturday to the Putnam County Fairgrounds.  A community shred event is being hosted by the Putnam County Board of REALTORS and sponsored by Brackney insurance Group and Earl & Co, CPA.

 

The event is free, however, while businesses are welcome, they will be limited to 10 boxes with a  minimum donation of $5 / box. 

 

Donations are encouraged and will benefit the Putnam County Board of REALTORS scholarship fund.

 

You can bring any papers you want to destroy securely.  Paper clips, small binder clips and staples can be left in place.  Make sure there are no other items mixed in with your papers, remove large binder clips and plastic folders / binders. 

 

All paper is shredded at the site.

 

At the site, drive up and follow the guidance of the greeters directing traffic flow.  Stay in your car at all times.  Materials will be unloaded for you and taken to the pre-shed bin.  You can leave immediately or wait until your items have been shredded.

 

Saturday’s shredding event is at the Putnam County Fairgrounds, 8:30 am – 10:30 am.

 

For more information, call 765-720-2091.

 

Indiana Debate Commission opens its season for Oct. 16 U.S. Senate debate

The Indiana Debate Commission will host a single debate between three U.S. Senate candidates Sunday, October 16, with a one-hour broadcast starting at 7 p.m. Eastern.

 

The single debate in this year’s race will include three candidates: incumbent Sen. Todd Young (Republican), Thomas McDermott (Democrat), and James Sceniak (Libertarian).

 

Anyone can submit questions for consideration in this debate, which will be moderated by Laura Merrifield Wilson, an associate professor of political science at the University of Indianapolis, and also a commission board member. She previously moderated a gubernatorial debate in 2016.

 

Questions for these candidates will come primarily from Hoosier voters, which can be submitted online at www.indianadebatecommission.com.

 

To submit a question for consideration, click “Ask Your Question” on the top menu of the commission website through Friday, Sept. 30. Questions will be reviewed and selected solely by the commission, and some submitters may be offered the opportunity to ask their questions in person.

 

The debate will be broadcast live from the studios of WFYI-TV in Indianapolis. The commission will provide a live broadcast feed and web stream to news media outlets across Indiana for viewers statewide.

 

Hoosiers will be able to view the debates locally, via live stream on the Indiana Debate Commission website and the commission’s YouTube channel.

 

The Indiana Debate Commission is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that organizes nonpartisan, citizen-focused political debates as a service to the public. Since 2007, the commission has produced 23 statewide debates in U.S. Senate and gubernatorial elections. The group’s work is underwritten by a variety of media and community organizations. The major sponsor for this year’s debate is AARP Indiana.

Putnam County Appreciation Days happening September 10 and 11

Head on out this weekend to the Putnam County Regional Airport located at 1595 Ballard Lane, Greencastle, IN 46135 on September 10-11, 2022. The event starts at 9:00 AM on Saturday and comes to end on Sunday at 4:00 PM.

 

A variety of vendors are set to be in attendance for a memorable weekend.

  1. The Greencastle Fire Department will be out both Saturday and Sunday with the Fire Engine and the Smoke House. The Smoke House is a great learning tool for the children to know what to do in case of a fire in the home. Fun and Education all tied into one.
  2. PRA Chapter 34 (Popular Rotorcraft Association): These guys and gals will have their aircraft on display. Stop by and chat with them about these interesting gryocopters.
  3. PDM Aviation will offer paid Airplane Rides in the 172 Cessna. Experience the freedom of flight and view beautiful Putnam County from the air. Flights will be available both Saturday Sept 10 and Sunday Sept 11.
  4. New for 2022 BOBA TIME drinks. Check out their refreshing fun flavors on both Saturday and Sunday.
  5. Figgy's Follies Entertainment will be entertaining throughout both days.
  6. The Spanish Lady -T6 You will not want to miss seeing the beautiful airplane. You will even be able to purchase a ride in this plane. Available both Saturday and Sunday.
  7. New for 2022 is the Brown Lab Boutique. The Brown Lab is a women’s boutique based out of Cory, Indiana. They offer trendy clothes at reasonable prices - in sizes small through 3x.
  8. Geno's Kettle Corn Good Stuff! Come check out all the amazing flavors on both Saturday and Sunday!!!
  9. Samantha Trissel Cooper and the Abstract and Title team will have information, snacks/water, and for the kids, temporary tattoos.
  10. CMA (Christian Motorcycle Association) will be joining for Saturday only. They will be making balloon animals and other fun stuff at their booth.
  11. Greencastle Lions Club will be joining on both days.
  12. Covered Bridge Harmony singing the National Anthem for open ceremonies at 9:00 am on Saturday. Covered Bridge Harmony is one of two Indiana chapters of Harmony, Inc, a not-for-profit international women’s barbershop organization whose mission statement is “to empower all women through education, friendship and a cappella singing in the barbershop style.” The chorus was chartered in 2003, and has women from Brazil, Cloverdale, Whiteland, Fishers and Greencastle who sing with the group. The chorus has sung the national anthem for a Colt’s game as well as with the Brazil Concert Band and Airport Appreciation Days. They have performed all over Putnam, Clay and Hendricks counties and are available to perform for nursing homes, festivals, clubs, etc.
  13. Greencastle Indiana Rotary will have stickers and other fun items for the kids of all ages, Be sure to stop by and talk to the about the cool things Rotary does for the community at home around the world.
  14. And Blondy's GIANT Tenderloins will be returning 2022 on Saturday September 10th only. You will not want to miss the best tasting tenderloin in Indiana.
  15. Big Bounce House Fun Rentals. Susan and her team will be out with games and inflatable activities for the kiddos both Saturday and Sunday.

 

This event is free and open to the public.

 

Annual land rent survey saw increases in 2022

Throughout the year, many individuals ask what the “going rate” is for farmland rental prices. That is a difficult question to answer. The rate fluctuates and is highly dependent on the individual farm ground being discussed. That is why when asked, Purdue Extension provides a range of values based on the annual Purdue Farmland Value Survey and stresses the importance of not simply utilizing the values given. Instead, landlords and tenants are told the final rental amount will need to be adjusted based on numerous items including the size of the field, drainage, soil fertility, ease of access for farm equipment, and much more. 

As a whole, the 2022 Purdue Farmland Value Survey found the average value of bare Indiana cropland increased. The average value of bare Indiana cropland ranged from $8,631 per acre for poor quality land (a 34% increase from 2021) to $12,808 per acre for top quality land (a 30.9% increase from 2021). The average corn yield for poor quality land was 161 bushels per acre and 221 bushels per acre for top quality land.

The 2022 survey average for Indiana cash rent increased too. On average, cash rents ranged between $207 per acre for poor quality land and $300 per acre for top quality land. Cash rents increased by 13.2% for poor quality land and 11.5% for top quality land since June of 2021.

The value for farmland moving out of agriculture (transition land) increased this year. The survey revealed there was a 36.5% increase in the average value of transition land since June of 2021. The average value of transition land in June 2022 was $24,240 per acre. The average value of recreational land increased by 21.8% since June of 2021. The average value of recreational land in June 2022 was $9,121 per acre. It is important to note that transition and recreational land values are quite volatile and have a wide range of values.

For individuals in our area it is probably of more importance to look at the results for the West Central Region. The West Central Region (consisting of Benton, Carroll, Fountain, Montgomery, Parke, Putnam, Tippecanoe, Vermillion, Warren, and White Counties), had cropland values that ranged from $9,012 per acre for poor quality land and $13,050 per acre for top quality land. Cash rents for the West Central Region varied from $247 per acre for poor quality land to $329 per acre for top quality land (average quality land was $289 per acre). For the West Central Region, cash rent values increased from 2021 to 2022.  The average corn yield for poor quality land was 170 bushels per acre and 229 bushels per acre for top quality land in this region.

Producers may also want to look at values for the Southwest Region due to the similarities in topography and soil productivity. The Southwest Region (consisting of Clay, Daviess, Dubois, Gibson, Greene, Knox, Martin, Owen, Pike, Posey, Spencer, Sullivan, Vanderburgh, Vigo, and Warrick Counties), had cropland values that ranged from $8,022 per acre for poor quality land and $13,825 per acre for top quality land. Cash rents for the Southwest Region varied from $194 per acre for poor quality land to $309 per acre for top quality land (average quality land was $244 per acre). For the Southwest Region, cash rent values increased from 2021 to 2022. The average corn yield for poor quality land was 164 bushels per acre and 236 bushels per acre for top quality land in this region.

To obtain your own copy of the 2022 Purdue Farmland Value Survey Results, contact your local Extension Office or go to: https://ag.purdue.edu/commercialag/home/paer-article/indiana-farmland-prices-grow-at-record-pace-in-2022/>. As a reminder, the values and information found within the survey should be adjusted for your individual situation when determining your rental agreement.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local Purdue Extension Office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution. All times listed are Eastern Time.

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