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Community News

Operation Roundup benefits Putnam County

Putnam County Giving Tree received a grant from the REMC Multi Community Trust. This grant of $6,000 is to help with providing Putnam County families with Christmas gifts for their children.

 

Parke County REMC participates in a national program known as Operation Roundup.  Customers of REMC are able to choose to round their bill up to the nearest dollar amount, the extra change being deposited into the Multi-County Community Trust. More than 8,000 customers choose to participate; their average donation is $6 per year per customer.

 

The Multi-County Community Trust is only available to the organizations with the service area of Parke County REMC, which includes six counties: Clay, Fountain, Montgomery, Parke, Putnam, and Vigo counties. At the end of the quarter, Parke County REMC Operation Roundup board members, all of whom are volunteers, meet and decided which charitable organization will receive a grant for that quarter.  

 

The REMC Multi-County Community Trust board met on September 14, 2021 and awarded a total of $13,900 to four nonprofits located in the Parke County REMC area of operation; $6,000 of which went to the Putnam County Giving Tree program.

 

Application deadline for the next cycle is Jan. 4, 2022. Nonprofit groups, organizations or individuals who are interested in applying for funds and meet eligibility requirements, may obtain an application at Parke County REMC, http://www.pcremc.com or by calling 765-569-3133 (800-537-3913).

GPD to host car seat clinic at GHS

The Greencastle Police Department will be conducting its annual Car Seat Clinic on Wednesday, September 22 from 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm at the Greencastle High School, 910 E. Washington Street.

 

In order for the Greencastle Police Department to be a Permanent Fitting Station for child safety seats, they are required to host a Car Seat Clinic. Not surprising, they have chosen to do this in the middle of Child Passenger Safety Week, September 19-25, which is hosted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).

 

The NHTSA estimates that almost half of child safety seats are not installed properly.  Road injuries are the leading cause of death for children in the U.S. However, when in a car accident, a car seat can reduce the risk of infant fatality by 71 percent. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration recommends children remain in rear-facing car seats for as long as possible, preferably 3 years old. They also recommend children under the age of 13 ride in the backseat. For more information on child car seat safety, as well as how to find other car seat check events, go to www.nhtsa.gov/therightseat.

 

The Greencastle Police Department is partnering with the Greencastle School Corporation this year and will be hosting the event in the student parking lot of the Greencastle High School. GPD will have certified Car Seat Technicians on hand to inspect car seats that are currently being used. They are looking to make sure the child seat fits the child properly, if the child seat is in good working condition, whether or not is on a recall list, if the seat has gone past the expiration date, and whether or not seat is properly and safely installed in the vehicle.

 

If a problem or defect is discovered with a child seat, the technician can replace the seat. If any has any questions regarding the Car Seat Clinic, they can call 765-653-2925 and ask for Police Chief Tom Sutherlin, Captain Chris Jones, or Officer Angela Taylor.

Greencastle Community Center project moves forward

The talk of Greencastle getting a community center has been a long one, something residents have talked about for over a decade.  You might remember a survey back in 2015 asking what you would want to see in a community center. You might even remember the first Greencastle City Council meeting when Sue Murray was mayor and made the announcement that Greencastle was indeed looking into a community center. For years, it has always felt like nothing more than talk.

 

Jacob M. Widner, Councilor-at-Large, expressed his frustrations at the September City Council meeting about the community center taking so long to complete. He, like many others in the community, was beginning to feel like this was just another pipe dream to be talked about but not completed. However, as Adam Cohen, First Ward, pointed out, various members of the City Council had sat through lengthy meetings, trying to push the project through and are, in fact, making progress.

 

Getting a new community center is not as simple as throwing up a building and adding in some desired amenities. There are complicated and legal steps that need to be taken, before the ground can even be broken. Plans have to be drawn, a site has to be chosen and purchased, a construction crew has to be hired, and attorneys have to draft all the legally required paperwork. The plans have been made with an open house in 2019 showcasing the proposed architecture; partnerships have been solidified with Putnam County Hospital and the Wabash Valley YMCA; the land has been purchased, it will be located near Big Walnut Sports Park; and a construction team has been chosen, though the team cannot be announced legally yet. What is taking so long? What sparked the frustration in Widner, causing him to question the rest of City Council’s priorities on the project? Contracts. The City of Greencastle was expecting to receive the contract documents on September 1, 2021. However, for reasons unknown, the attorneys are running behind.

 

To assuage the concerns Widner was still feeling towards the project, Adam Cohen offered “…at this point, we’ve too come to turn back.”

 

The Community Center is coming, but with so many working parts, it is taking time.

Fall Armyworm Attacks

It’s gone. They ate everything. Nothing is left. Those are words used to describe the destruction caused by fall armyworms recently in Putnam County and throughout the state of Indiana. So, what have these fall armyworms ate? To be exact, we have heard reports of them damaging lawns, eating alfalfa fields, and destroying a deer plot. Normally, this pest is not of big concern in Indiana; however, this year it has done significant damage.

What does a fall armyworm look like? It is a caterpillar. The head is dark colored with a predominant white, inverted Y-shape on top of it. This inverted “Y” shape is what helps distinguishes the fall armyworm from other armyworm species. 

These pests typically remain in the subtropical climates for most of the year, but can be blown northward during hurricane season into the interior of the continent. Once in the interior, they lay eggs in masses on vertical objects (such as sides of buildings) and on young, tender foliage of late-developing crops. The larvae that develop from the eggs can be so numerous that they eventually chew the turf and other plants to the ground. In the case of alfalfa and fescue, they completely strip the foliage from the plants.

The fall armyworms that impacted us a few weeks ago have pupated and are beginning to emerge as adults. These adults will soon begin to mate and lay more eggs that will produce another, potentially destructive, larval generation. The new larval generation may not occur in the same place that the previous infestation occured. That is because the adults will disperse and find a more suitable location for their offspring which may be another nearby forage field or lawn. 

Since we know there is a potential for another generation of fall armyworms, there are a few things to keep in mind. Scout for egg clusters now. Scout for the next generation of larva around the last half of September and the first half of October. If you do find fall armyworms, you can try to manage them with an insecticide. There are a number of different insecticide active ingredients that you can use. For turf, some of the active ingredients include bifenthrin, carbaryl, permethrin, and trichlorfon. In alfalfa, some of the active ingredients include carbaryl, cyfluthrin, and permethrin. If you are going to treat an alfalfa field, be mindful of the harvest restrictions listed on the label.

When selecting an insecticide, try to use a formula that is a liquid because it provides better coverage and works more quickly. If you are utilizing an insecticide in your lawn, try to mow before applying it because mowing will help with the application. As always, if you do decide to use an insecticide, remember to read and follow all label instructions.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local Purdue Extension Office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution. All times listed are Eastern Time.

Upcoming Events:

September 21, 28 – Fall Walking Group, 9am, Big Walnut Sports Park, register at
                                765-301-7641

September 22 – Recognizing Hazards Around the Farm webinar, 12 pm register at
                           https://tinyurl.com/WIAWebinars21

September 27 – ServSafe 1-Day Class and Online Exam, 9am-4pm, Fairgrounds, register
                at https://purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

October 5, 12, 19, 26 – Fall Walking Group, 9am, Big Walnut Sports Park, register at
                           765-301-7641

October 19 – Medicare & Diabetes, Fairgrounds, 2 pm, register at 765-653-8411

October 19 – Pork: The No Hogwash Protein webinar, 12 pm register at
                      https://tinyurl.com/WIAWebinars21

Berry Street Festival returns

Its official, Berry Street Festival is making a comeback on Saturday, October 2,  from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm.

 

A tradition, thought to be forgotten is being rejuvenated by a new generation. Jennifer Grumme, who fondly remembers the Berry Street Festival, and Derek Chastain, who had always heard about it but was never able to attend, decided the over 70 year tradition was too important to the community and the neighborhood to let it disappear.

 

After researching the long history of Berry Street Festival, Jennifer and Derek learned it started as a picnic in 1947. A Berry Street resident, Russell Myers, encouraged his neighbors to join together for a picnic. This continued for 15 years, however, interest began dissipating as the original neighbors passed away or moved to a new location. It would be 13 years before Berry Street would get its first revival.

 

In 1975, Joyce Leer and Jackie Young, residents of Berry Street, decided the neighborhood could benefit from gathering once again. This time, however, they decided it was a good time for the neighbors to also host a yard sale and it started growing again. As the years passed, it became tradition to host the festival on the first Saturday of October and generations would carry on as the time came active Berry Street Festival committee members stepped down. As time moved on, it became harder and harder to keep up with the hosting responsibilities. 2017 would be the last year of an official Berry Street Festival.

 

Now, after rough years involving divisive politics, the Covid-19 pandemic, and the stress of quarantine and trying to stay safe in our new normal, Jennifer and Derek are hoping to make this an annual tradition again. They have received donations to help cover the cost of the port-a-potties, as well as a cotton candy machine from Headley Hardware (proceeds benefiting next year’s festival) and vendors ready to set up their wares and food. Jennifer and Derek met with the Greencastle City Council last night and were approved for street closures; something they felt was needed as they have live music scheduled. They are hoping to add other amenities, like bounce houses, to ensure families of all types find something to enjoy at this long held tradition.

 

There is still time to donate or sign up to participate. Contact Jennifer Grumme at grummej@gmail.com or call 765-721-0758. Or, you can contact Derek Chastain at derekchastain89@icloud.com or by calling 317-358-5267.

Flags to half-staff in remembrance of 9/11

Governor Eric J. Holcomb is directing flags statewide to be flown at half-staff in honor of Patriot Day.

 

Flags should be flown at half-staff from sunrise until sunset on Saturday, Sept. 11.

 

Gov. Holcomb also asks businesses and residents to lower their flags to half-staff in remembrance of the victims of the Sept. 11.

September is Better Breakfast Month

Kids who fuel up in the morning focus and concentrate better in the classroom and perform better on math, reading and standardized tests. They also have fewer behavior problems and are less likely to be tardy. Eating breakfast also can help children maintain a healthy weight. Unfortunately, studies show many children don’t eat breakfast every day.

 

Breakfast is a perfect time to enjoy fruits and vegetables children need for optimal health. Try fresh seasonal fruit alone or in cereal, add frozen fruits to yogurt or toss chopped vegetables into an omelet.

 

Healthy Breakfasts for Busy Mornings

Get the morning nutrition you need with these quick breakfast ideas.

  • Instant oatmeal: Make it with fat-free or low-fat milk instead of water. Toss in raisins or dried cranberries and chopped walnuts. Or mix in ¼ cup unsweetened applesauce and sprinkle with apple pie spice or cinnamon.
  • Yogurt parfait: Layer fat-free or low-fat plain yogurt with your crunchy cereal and blueberries.
  • Breakfast smoothie: Blend low-fat milk, frozen strawberries and a banana.
  • Toaster waffle: Toast and top with nut butter and apple slices.
  • Pita egg sandwich: Stuff a whole-wheat pita with a sliced, hard-cooked egg and low-fat shredded cheese.
  • Banana roll-up: Spread peanut butter on a whole-wheat tortilla. Add a peeled, whole banana and roll it up.
  • Bagel and veggies: Spread hummus on a whole-grain toasted bagel. Top with sliced cucumbers and tomatoes.
  • English muffin: Add lean ham and low-fat Swiss cheese to a toasted whole-grain English muffin.

Get Yourself Prepped

While breakfast might seem like a hurdle in your busy morning, nutritious food doesn't need to take extra time to prepare. Try the following tips:

  • Get organized the night before. Get out a pan for pancakes or a blender for smoothies. Prepare muffin or waffle mix so it's ready to cook in the morning. Set out a few boxes of whole-grain cereal for kids to choose — all they'll have to do in the morning is add milk.
  • Set the alarm 10 minutes earlier. Hectic mornings can make it difficult for kids (and parents) to find time for breakfast. Waking up just a few minutes earlier provides time to squeeze in a quick morning meal.
  • Pack your breakfast to go. If there's no time to eat at home, plan a nutritious option to eat on the bus or when you arrive at work. Busy teens can grab a banana, a bag of trail mix and a carton of milk. Don't forget to see if your school offers a breakfast program.
  • Help make sure your kids have an appetite. Many kids aren't hungry for breakfast because they snack too much at night. Try offering lighter snacks in the evening and you might be surprised how much hungrier they are in the morning. In addition, try having your children dress first and eat second. Kids are more likely to feel hungry once they have a chance to wake up.
  • Be a positive role model. Children will mimic their parents' behavior, so make it a habit to sit down and eat a nutritious breakfast with your kids every morning.

Whatever your morning routine, remember that breakfast is an important meal for the family, and doesn't have to be very time-consuming. When you eat well in the morning, you and your family will be on the nutrition fast track for a high-energy day. Source: Eat Right

 

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

Upcoming Events

September 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 19 – Fall Walking Group, 9am, Big Walnut Sports Park, register at 765-301-7641

September 22 – Recognizing Hazards Around the Farm webinar, 12 pm register at https://tinyurl.com/WIAWebinars21

September 27 – ServSafe 1-Day Class and Online Exam, 9am-4pm, Fairgrounds, register at https://purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

Putnam 4-Her's at the Indiana State Fair

While the opportunity to learn while doing in 4-H project work is of foremost importance, the recognition of achievement through exhibition is certainly an added bonus to being in the 4-H program. The Indiana State Fair (ISF) and the Purdue Extension state staff has listed unofficial results for most projects. Search online using the keywords “Purdue Extension 4-H” and you will find a link as a green box to view the ISF results for both animal and non-animal projects. Updates according to ISF officials will continue to occur, especially for animal projects.

Overall, Putnam County 4-Hers were the recipients of 32 merit or honor ribbons, which are given sparingly to those are among the best and go beyond the basic exhibit requirements. For comparative purposes, last year there were 34 and the average is 31.

This year there were 159 blue ribbons compared to last year’s 157 blue ribbons awarded, and 32 red ribbons compared to last year’s 17 red ribbons awarded. There were 204 Putnam exhibit hall projects or activities entered at this year’s ISF compared to 141 last year and 177 in 2019, a year more normal to this year. Adding in livestock exhibition, Putnam 4-Hers contributed more than 300 ISF exhibits and activities in 2021. Since 2009, merit ribbons awarded to Putnam 4-Hers at ISF has averaged 31 per year while the median was 28 for exhibit hall projects and activities. During the same period, blue ribbons earned by Putnam 4-Her’s at ISF averaged 124 with a median of 116.

For the first time in five years, there were no sweepstakes winners. The sweepstakes winners are the top person in that project in the state. Many counties go for years without sweepstakes winners. Putnam County had had sweepstakes winners for four consecutive years with two sweepstakes winners in a single year during three of the previous four years. With 92 counties, usually three age divisions, sweepstakes winners may top a group of more than 200 individuals.

Despite no sweepstakes winners, there were many successes in the animal projects. Evan Hinkle had Best of Breed Polish at the state fair Rabbit Show. Putnam County llama and alpaca members were very successful in showmanship at the state fair taking seven of the top ten places in the grade 3-5 junior division and another Putnam 4-Her was in the top ten in the intermediate grade 6-8 division. Emmie Haddon was awarded champion milking shorthorn junior showmanship and received third place in her milking shorthorn heifer class.   

All 4-Hers are to be reminded that the due date for “My Record of Achievement” is September 3rd to be assured consideration for 2021 awards. It will be determined later the format of the awards program that is typically the first Sunday in November. Forms received after the due date will still be accepted and may be based on the number submitted and degree of lateness to be processed in time for the awards program. Completion of “My Record of Achievement” is also required for those who will be applying for 4-H scholarships from both the state and county level. Please call if you have questions or ask your 4-H leader who will be willing to help. This form is on the Purdue Extension-Putnam County website in an editable format and contact office if you can’t find it.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming events

September 2 – Staying Scam Safe, 6pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

September 3 – Record of Achievement Due for 4-H members

September 6 – Labor Day Holiday, Extension Office closed

September 7, 14, 21, 28 – Fall Walking Group, 9am, Big Walnut Sports Park, register at
                                765-301-7641

September 22 – Recognizing Hazards Around the Farm webinar, 12 pm register at
                           https://tinyurl.com/WIAWebinars21

September 27 – ServSafe 1-Day Class and Online Exam, 9am-4pm, Fairgrounds, register
                at https://purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

 

 

 

   Photo: Emmie Haddon proudly displays her awards of champion 4-H milking shorthorn junior showmanship and third place in her milking shorthorn class at Indiana State Fair (courtesy photo).                Photo: Emmie Haddon proudly displays her awards of champion 4-H milking shorthorn junior showmanship and third place in her milking shorthorn class at Indiana State Fair (courtesy photo).

Mansfield Mill will be part of cornbread festival, Sept. 11, 12

The Historic Mansfield Roller Mill will be open for tours during Mansfield’s Annual Cornbread Festival on Sept. 11 and 12 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

The mill still operates much like it did during the 1880s and shows visitors how flour and cornmeal were processed from wheat and corn.

The festival will have activities throughout the village including a meal of beans and cornbread available for purchase at the Mansfield Bar and Grill.

The Historic Mansfield Roller Mill is managed by Raccoon State Recreation Area (on.IN.gov.raccoonsra) and is at 6089 South Mill Road, Mansfield, 47872.

Purdue's Annual Land Rent Survey

Throughout the year, many individuals ask what the “going rate” is for farmland rental prices. That is a difficult question to answer. The rate fluctuates and is highly dependent on the individual farm ground being discussed. That is why when asked, Purdue Extension provides a range of values based on the annual Purdue Farmland Value Survey and stresses the importance of not simply utilizing the values given. Instead, landlords and tenants are told the final rental amount will need to be adjusted based on numerous items including the size of the field, drainage, soil fertility, ease of access for farm equipment, and much more. 

As a whole, the 2021 Purdue Farmland Value Survey found the average value of bare Indiana cropland improved. The average value of bare Indiana cropland ranged from $6,441 per acre for poor quality land (a 12.1% increase from 2020) to $9,785 per acre for top quality land (a 14.1% increase from 2020). The average corn yield for poor quality land was 153 bushels per acre and 212 bushels per acre for top quality land.

The 2021 survey average for Indiana cash rent increased. On average, cash rents ranged between $183 per acre for poor quality land and $269 per acre for top quality land. Cash rents increased by 4.6% for poor quality land and 3.9% for top quality land since June of 2020.

The value for farmland moving out of agriculture (transition land) increased this year. The survey revealed there was a 17.4% increase in the average value of transition land since June of 2021. The average value of transition land in June 2021 was $17,759 per acre. The average value of recreational land increased by 93.1% since June of 2021. The average value of recreational land in June 2021 was $7,486 per acre. It is important to note that transition and recreational land values are quite volatile and have a wide range of values.

For individuals in our area it is probably of more importance to look at the results for the West Central Region. The West Central Region (consisting of Benton, Carroll, Fountain, Montgomery, Parke, Putnam, Tippecanoe, Vermillion, Warren, and White Counties), had cropland values that ranged from $7,849 per acre for poor quality land and $10,970 per acre for top quality land. Cash rents for the West Central Region varied from $222 per acre for poor quality land to $302 per acre for top quality land (average quality land was $262 per acre). For the West Central Region, cash rent values increased from 2020 to 2021.  The average corn yield for poor quality land was 165 bushels per acre and 217 bushels per acre for top quality land in this region.

Producers may also want to look at values for the Southwest Region due to the similarities in topography and soil productivity. The Southwest Region (consisting of Clay, Daviess, Dubois, Gibson, Greene, Knox, Martin, Owen, Pike, Posey, Spencer, Sullivan, Vanderburgh, Vigo, and Warrick Counties), had cropland values that ranged from $5,965 per acre for poor quality land and $11,696 per acre for top quality land. Cash rents for the Southwest Region varied from $164 per acre for poor quality land to $288 per acre for top quality land (average quality land was $225 per acre). For the Southwest Region, cash rent values increased from 2020 to 2021. The average corn yield for poor quality land was 145 bushels per acre and 219 bushels per acre for top quality land in this region.

To obtain your own copy of the 2021 Purdue Farmland Value Survey, contact your local Extension Office or go to: < https://ag.purdue.edu/agecon/Pages/Purdue-Agricultural-Economics-Report-Archive.aspx>. As a reminder, the values and information found within the survey should be adjusted for your individual situation when determining your rental agreement.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local Purdue Extension Office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution. All times listed are Eastern Time.

Upcoming Events:

August 24 – State Fair Project Pick Up (Extension office dropped off), Extension office

September 2 – Staying Scam Safe, 6pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

September 7, 14, 21, 28 – Fall Walking Group, 9am, Big Walnut Sports Park, register at
                                765-301-7641

September 22 – Recognizing Hazards Around the Farm webinar, 12 pm register at
                           https://tinyurl.com/WIAWebinars21

September 27 – ServSafe 1-Day Class and Online Exam, 9am-4pm, Fairgrounds, register
                at https://purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

Staying Scam Safe

People all around the world are affected by scams every single day. Are you prepared to react if you suspect a scam? If you are not, consider joining us for this scam program. This program will cover some common types of scams, provide you with proactive steps you can take to protect yourself and your information, and show you where you can go to report scams or frauds that have taken place.

 

Join us for this free, educational program presented by Abbi Sampson, Purdue University Extension Educator in Health & Human Sciences in Putnam County. This program is being offered September 2nd at 6:00 pm at the Putnam County Fairgrounds, York Auto Community Building.

 

If you would like to join us for the program, please pre-register by calling the Extension Office at 765-653-8411 or emailing sampsona@purdue.edu. This program and all programs of the Purdue University Extension Service are open to everyone. If you need a reasonable accommodation to participate in this program, please contact Abbi Sampson at 765-653-8411 or sampsona@purdue.edu by August 27th

 

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local Purdue Extension Office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution. All times listed are Eastern Time.

 

Upcoming Events:

August 21 – Enhancing Your Garden Soil Health Program, 10am, ISU Community Garden, register at https://tinyurl.com/PHISH2021   

August 22 – State Fair Ends

August 23 – 4-H Education Pledge Program, Noon, signup at https://tinyurl.com/4f4j37ae

August 23 – State Fair Project Pick Up (family dropped off), Indiana State Fair

August 24 – State Fair Project Pick Up (Extension office dropped off), Extension office

September 2 – Staying Scam Safe, 6pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

September 7, 14, 21, 28 – Fall Walking Group, 9am, Big Walnut Sports Park, register at 765-301-7641

September 27 – ServSafe 1-Day Class and Online Exam, 9am-4pm, Fairgrounds, register at https://purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

Regina Dean hosting Ohio Street block party on Saturday

Regina Dean has called Greencastle home for years. She has seen the strength of the community, banding together for one another, but she also seen the strain the last year has had on the community she holds dear.

 

For years, Regina wanted to do something special for the Greencastle community.

 

“This has been in my heart. I love my community. Greencastle is my home,” Regina said.  

 

After witnessing the effects of quarantine, she decided now was the time to do what she can to give back some of the joy and remind the community that everyone is in this together.

 

“No matter what we are going through, we are still loved.”

 

Saturday, August 14, from noon to 10:00 pm, you can enjoy the first, of hopefully many, block parties on Ohio Street. Smitty’s BBQ is providing pulled pork, hot dogs, brats, burgers, chips, desserts, and more for a small fee, with the proceeds going toward a block party for next year.

 

When you are not enjoying the tasty treats, you can participate in the games, like corn hole, play on the playground, go swimming, enjoy card games, or even enter the dance contest for a chance to win a T-shirt.

Crop report takeaway: 'Indiana crop production doing very well'

Purdue College of Agriculture and Extension and United States Department of Agriculture experts gathered at the Indiana State Fair on Thursday (Aug. 12) to discuss the results of the 2021 USDA crop report and the current status of Indiana’s major cash crops.

Jason Henderson, director of Purdue Extension and senior associate dean of the Purdue College of Agriculture, moderated the discussion among panelists. Panelists were Nathanial Warenski, state statistician of the USDA, NASS, Indiana field office; Dan Quinn, Purdue assistant professor of agronomy and new extension corn specialist; Shaun Casteel, Purdue associate professor of agronomy and extension soybean and small grains specialist; Beth Hall, Indiana State Climatologist; and Jim Mintert, Purdue professor of agricultural economics and director of the Purdue Center for Commercial Agriculture. 

Indiana corn production is forecasted to reach 1.02 billion bushels this year, which would be a 3.7 % increase from 2020 production. The expected yield is up 3.7% from 2020 at 194 bushels per acre. As of Aug. 1, corn condition was rated 76% good to excellent.

“Indiana corn looks good to great and we hope to keep this trend to finish strong. A few things that stood out to me include disease, specifically tar spot and corn rust, and past saturated conditions that could potentially impact the yield,” Quinn said.

Soybean yield is projected to reach 60 bushels per acre, compared to 58 bushels per acre in 2020. As of Aug. 1, soybean condition was rated 72% good to excellent.

“In terms of the soybeans, this season has been anything but normal. We’ve had wet and drought conditions, affecting the root systems and causing disease. The next 35 days are critical for yield development,” Casteel said.

The panel also discussed the crop market, trade and potential impacts from wildfires.

“We have started seeing some of the impacts of the wildfires, including traveling smoke, which is effective at blocking sunlight,” Hall said.

Mintert said, “Today’s report was a bit of surprise when looking at USDA estimates versus trade. This will be a very positive crop year in terms of income and does lead us to expect positive impacts on cash-rent.”

Henderson ended the discussion by observing: “The main takeaway from this report is that Indiana crop production is doing very well. Other areas of the nation weren’t so fortunate, which will potentially open up market opportunities for Indiana farmers.”

The USDA August Crop Report is available online.

PC CERT - Project Lifesaver

Audio provided by PC CERT's Public Health and Public Engagement Unit Leader, Brian Williams. 

 

Putnam County CERT is proud to be rolling out Project Lifesaver, a first-of-its-kind program for Putnam County. While this program is a first for our community, it has existed nationwide since 1999, when it was first founded in Chesapeake, Virginia.

 

Project Lifesaver is a not-for-profit organization, providing emergency response teams with the tools to quickly locate those who are prone to wandering off, such as a child with autism or an elderly adult with dementia. For a small fee, your loved one is provided an electronic bracelet or anklet. Should they ever become lost; individuals trained by Project Lifesaver can utilize radio waves to locate your loved one.

 

According to Project Lifesaver, agencies who utilize this technology are 95% faster at locating someone wearing a lifesaver device. Agencies, like Putnam County CERT, are trained how to use the device and its locating program as well innovative search and rescue methods and the cognitive conditions that cause some individuals to wander off more often.

 

If you have questions about the program or would like to volunteer for CERT, you can contact the Putnam County CERT team on their Facebook page at facebook.com/PutnamCountyINCERT, emailing Chief Sarah Owen at chief@pccert.org, or by visiting one of their monthly meetings, held the second Monday of each month, 7:00 pm at the Putnam County EOC, located at 1600 W CO RD 225 S.

Putnam County CERT Aids the Community

“Everybody can be great. Because anybody can serve. You don’t have to have a college degree to serve. You don’t have to make your subject and your verb agree to serve…. You don’t have to know the second theory of thermodynamics in physics to serve. You only need a heart full of grace. A soul generated by love.”
~Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

Putnam County CERT is a volunteer program aimed at supporting Putnam County's Emergency Response Organizations. The volunteers are often seen at community events, such as directing traffic for the Putnam County Fair Parade. They also supply weather alerts, so each emergency response team is as prepared as possible to aid their communities.

 

According to Putnam County CERT Chief, Sarah Owen, the Putnam County CERT team currently has just over 80, well trained, volunteers. These volunteers receive training in a variety of fields from search and rescue, to fire safety, weather safety, and so much more. Volunteers train in the areas that interest them and are then paired with the volunteer opportunities in those areas.

 

If you are interested in volunteering, or simply want to know more, you can visit the Putnam County CERT team on their Facebook page at facebook.com/PutnamCountyINCERT, emailing Chief Sarah Owen at chief@pccert.org, or by visiting one of their monthly meetings, held the second Monday of each month, 7:00 pm at the Putnam County EOC, located at 1600 W CO RD 225 S.

Putnam County Fall Walking

Purdue Extension and Putnam County Hospital are teaming up again for their Putnam County Fall Walking program. Everyone, regardless of age or fitness level, is invited to Big Walnut Sports Park, Tuesdays at 9 am, starting September 7. You can join as your schedule allows and it’s a great way to work in some fitness while building on friendships ore even making new friends. You can register by calling Hannah Cline at Putnam County Hospital, 765-301-7641 to register, or just show up. If you have any questions, please contact Abbi at sampsona@purdue.edu or 765-653-8411.

 

 

Roachdale photographer among Indiana Agriculture photo contest winners

Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch and the Indiana State Department of Agriculture announced the winners of the 2021 Indiana Agriculture photo contest. The winning photographs will be displayed in the lieutenant governor’s Family of Business office in Indianapolis.

“As I travel across our state I am always awestruck by the beauty of our state’s agricultural landscape from round barns to wildlife and so much more,” Crouch said. “These photos are a wonderful addition to my business office’s walls and serve as a wonderful reminder of the strength and beauty of Indiana agriculture.”

The winning photos were chosen from hundreds of entries in the following four categories: Agritourism, Conservation, Faces of Agriculture and On the Farm. Two winners were selected from each category, along with two winners overall.

To be considered, the photo had to be taken in the state by an Indiana resident. The photos were evaluated by a panel of independent judges based on creativity, composition and category representation.

“I am so grateful for each of the photographers who submitted their photos in this year’s contest,” said Bruce Kettler, director of the Indiana State Department of Agriculture. “Each of the submissions truly captured the essence of rural life and the important role agriculture plays in our state. Thank you for using your talent to showcase Indiana’s agriculture industry.”

The following list includes the photo contest winners for 2021:

Agritourism Category

  • “Pollination” by Amber Beams from Roachdale
  • “Magical Midway” by Jenise Stewart from Nabb

Conservation Category

  • “Last Light” by Sarah Greene from Loogootee
  • “The Coneflower Bee” by Sarah Sands from Pierceton

Faces of Agriculture Category

  • “4-H” by Andi Pollert from Seymour
  • “Farmer Frank” by Beth Legge from Moores Hill

On the Farm Category

  • “Among the Flowers” by Cecile Dreyer from Sellersburg
  • “Bushels of Fire” by Tom Jones from Star City

Overall Category

  • “Nature’s Unicorn” by Kyle Doles from Indianapolis
  • “Newborn” by Ross Waitt from Sheridan

Troopers focus on Back-to-School safety

As the summer break comes to an end, students across Indiana are starting their return to school.  With that return to school, the Indiana State Police would remind all motorists to be focused on traffic safety during morning and afternoon commutes.

 

Motorists should be prepared to experience an increased amount of school bus traffic and children walking to and from their bus stops and schools during the early morning and mid-afternoon hours. Plan your commutes accordingly to allow for extended travel time during these periods. Special attention should be given to the posted reduced School Zone speed limits, and for school buses regularly stopping to load or unload students. Children are often unpredictable and may dart out in front of  traffic unexpectedly!

 

Indiana traffic law requires motorists to the operate in a safe and responsible manner when approaching a stopped school bus that has its red lights flashing and stop arm extended.

 

  • When approaching a school bus from any direction, which is stopped and has its red lights flashing and stop arm extended, motorists are required to STOP, even on multiple lane highways where there is no barrier or median separating lanes of traffic.
  • Motorists on a highway that is divided by a barrier, such as cable barrier, concrete wall, or grassy median, are required to stop only if they are traveling in the same direction as the school bus.
  • Always be prepared to stop for a school bus and watch for children. Children are unpredictable. Not only is disregarding a school bus stop arm dangerous, but it is also a serious offense.

The Indiana State Police is committed to the safety of our children by keeping Indiana’s roadways safe through education and enforcement patrols. 

Circles Open House

Come join Circles during their open house on August 5, 6:00 pm, at Gobin United Methodist Church in Greencastle. This is an excellent chance to explore a program that has not only helped community members get on their feet and reach financially stable and thriving lifestyle, but has also helped community members give back to the community we all know and love.

 

It can be tiresome and overwhelming trying to put food on the table or pay the bills.  Sometimes it is impossible to see the light at the end of the tunnel as you struggle to survive and keep your family safe and healthy.  You see opportunities around you, but you are never sure if they are the right ones or how to take the right step for fear of tipping the teetering scale the wrong direction.

 

If this sounds like you, then Circles of Putnam County is for you.  Whether you receive assistance like SNAP, Medicaid, or other benefits; or you are under-resourced, making just enough NOT to qualify for assistance, but still struggling, Circles can be the guiding light you need.

 

You will attend a free 12-week learning experience and gain tools to help you on your journey on Thursdays from 6-8 pm at Gobin United Methodist Church in Greencastle, with dinner and childcare provided.  You will meet community members who can offer valuable resources and guide you to opportunities.  After the 12-weeks, you will be paired with Allies who check in with you, support you, and help you on your path from simply surviving to fully thriving.  You will be part of a community with the opportunity to continue coming each week as often as you like.  You will be listened to and your views can be part of conversations that empower others.  

 

If you have questions or want to sign up for the group, contact Lori Miller at 765-653-6049. 

Greencastle blood drive Monday as Red Cross warns of blood shortage

The American Red Cross has an emergency need for lifesaving blood amid the ongoing severe blood shortage. Blood donations continue to be critical to meet hospital demand and the public is urged to make an appointment to give now.

 

The Red Cross has been distributing about 12% more blood products to hospitals across the U.S. compared to this time last year. The Red Cross needs to collect more than 1,000 additional blood donations each day to meet the current hospital demand and end the severe blood shortage. Donors of all blood types are needed, especially type O, which stands at just a one-day supply right now.

 

To thank donors who help ensure a strong blood supply in August, all who come to give Aug. 1-15, 2021, will automatically be entered for a chance to win an exclusive, VIP trip for two to the sold-out 2021 Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival. Those who come to donate throughout August will also receive afree 4-month subscription offer to Apple Music by email (new subscribers only). More details are available atRedCrossBlood.org/FeelTheBeat.

 

Donors who give now will help stock the shelves as we wind down the summer season. Schedule an appointment to give blood by using the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting RedCrossBlood.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or enabling the Blood Donor Skill on any Alexa Echo device.

 

In most cases, those who have received a COVID-19 vaccine can donate. However, knowing the name of the manufacturer of the vaccine they received is important in determining donation eligibility.

 

Upcoming blood donation opportunities Aug. 1-15

 

Greencastle

8/2/2021: 2 p.m. - 7 p.m., Lifebuilder Community Church, 637 E Washington Street

 

Avon

8/6/2021: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., IU Health West Hospital, 1111 Ronald Regan Pkwy

 

8/10/2021: 2 p.m. - 7 p.m., Songs of Hope, 102 South 9th Street

 

 

Spencer

8/6/2021: 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., Spencer Masonic Lodge #95, 385 N Harrison St

8/12/2021: 1 p.m. - 6 p.m., Owen County Fairgrounds, 364 S East St

_______________

State Road 47 to close August 2 in Montgomery County

The Indiana Department of Transportation announces State Road 47 will close on or after Monday, August 2 at the bridge over Karnes Creek, just north of C.R. 550 South.

 

The 12 day closure is for remedial work from last year’s construction project.

 

The repair work on the small structure just south of C.R. 300 South on S.R. 47 will be done under flagging motorists around construction one lane at a time.

 

White Construction Co. was awarded the $1.4 million contract.

Spotted lanternfly found in Indiana

Spotted lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) was found in Indiana for the first time in Switzerland County earlier this week, the farthest west the insect has been found. This federally regulated invasive species has a detrimental impact upon plant growth and fruit production, especially in vineyards and orchards.

A homeowner in Vevay contacted DNR’s Division of Entomology & Plant Pathology (DEPP) with a picture that was taken outside his home of a fourth instar, or developmental stage, larvae. DEPP staff surveyed the site and discovered an infestation in the woodlot adjacent to a few homes in the area. The site is within 2 miles of the Ohio River and the Markland Dam. DEPP and USDA are conducting an investigation to determine exactly how large the infestation is and where it could have come from, as well as how to limit the spread and eradicate the population.

Spotted lanternfly is a planthopper that originated in Asia. It was first discovered in the United States in Pennsylvania in 2014. The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture tried to limit the spread of this pest, but it excels at being a hitchhiker and is often spread unknowingly by humans.

Adult spotted lanternfly has two sets of wings, and the underwing has a very distinct red color with spots on the outer wings. The fourth instar of the insect is bright red with black and white markings. The egg masses of this invasive insect look like mud and they can be spread by vehicle transport including recreational vehicles, cargo carriers (truck transport) and freight trains.

 

 

They can also be spread through trade materials sold in infested areas that are shipped out of state including nursery stock, outdoor furniture, lumber, etc. Anyone receiving goods from the east coast should inspect for signs of the insect, especially if the commodity is to be kept outdoors.

Spotted lanternfly prefers to feed on tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima), but it has been found on more than 103 species of plant including walnut, oak, maple, and various fruit trees. This insect is often found on grapevines in vineyards. Adult insects have piercing, sucking mouthparts and weaken the plants through feeding on them, which can make it difficult for the plant to survive the winter months. Congregating spotted lanternfly insects produce a sticky substance called “honeydew” in large quantities that over time becomes infested with sooty mold that attracts other pests in the area.

The Indiana DNR is asking for all citizens to keep an eye out for spotted lanternfly. The bright color of both the last instars and the adults of the insect should be present at this time of the year. Anyone that spots signs of the spotted lanternfly should contact DEPP by calling 866-NO EXOTIC (866-663-9684) or send an email to DEPP@dnr.IN.gov. For more information on this or other invasive pests see the following link https://www.in.gov/dnr/entomology/pests-of-concern/spotted-lanternfly/

 

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Sample Post 2

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Sample Post 1

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