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Community News

Providing pollinator habitats

It is not uncommon to hear individuals talk about pollinators and/or a pollinator garden.  Pollinators are important to our daily lives. It is estimated that 1 in every 3 bites of food is due to pollinators. Additionally, it is estimated over $18.9 billion dollars’ worth of crops in the United States depend on pollinators. 

The term pollinator refers to an animal that assist plants through the pollination process. They do this by moving pollen from one part of the flower of a plant to another part. This pollen then fertilizes the plant. Indiana is home to 430 different species of bees, 144 different species of butterflies, more than 2,000 different species of moths, and many different species of flower-visiting flies, wasps, ants, and beetles who serve as pollinators. Some of the common pollinators that individuals think about are honeybees, bumblebees, carpenter bees, monarch butterflies, swallowtail butterflies, and the Luna moth. 

To help pollinators thrive, many individuals have designated a portion of their property as a pollinator habitat. Pollinator habitats are often made with a variety of native plants that bloom in different colors, shapes, and sizes. This is important because different pollinators like different types of flowers. For example, red tubular flowers with a nectar reward tend to attract hummingbirds. Bees and flies with shorter mouthparts often visit daisy-like flowers that provide nectar and pollen in shallow flowers.

Pollinator habitats often have plants that are blooming throughout the growing season (spring, summer, and fall). Lastly, pollinator habitats often contain plants that some individuals would classify as weeds because they provide food for the pollinators, including dandelions, milkweed, goldenrod, and clover.

As you consider planting more pollinator friendly plants on your property, you may want to take the time to look at POL-6 Recommended Indiana-Native Plants for Attracting Pollinators from Purdue Extension. This publication will provide you with a list of plants that you may want to consider planting. It provides you with information such as when it blooms, what color it blooms, what growing conditions it needs, and if it is hard to find. For instance, if you are looking for a native tree that is pollinator friendly, you could try a red maple (Acer rubrum). According to this publication, red maple trees can handle wet mesic to dry mesic soil moisture, gets up to 95 feet tall, has yellow flowers in the spring, and is great for bees, butterflies, moths, flies, and wasps. In comparison, the Ohio buckeye (Aesculus glabra) gets to 35 feet tall, has yellow flowers in the spring, and is great for bees and hummingbirds.

For more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution. All times listed are Eastern Time.

 

Upcoming Events:

June 29 – Exploring 4-H Field Day, see 4honline email

June 30 – Public Speaking Demonstration and Summer Judging 4-H contests, Fairgrounds, 5 pm.

July 12 – Forest Management and Selling Timber webinar, 12 pm, register at
               https://women4theland.org/upcoming-events

July 12 – FairEntry.com deadline for all 4-H projects (except rabbits July 16) entered for county fair

July 22-29 – Putnam County 4-H Fair

4-H Youth Programs Offered in School Settings

Indiana is very blessed to have overall an excellent working relationship between FFA ag science programs and 4-H youth development programs. While both offer different programs and vary in delivery, the career development events are very much shared events for youth in both organizations to develop career and life skills. Ag science in the middle school and high schools is rooted to the Smith-Hughes Act passed in 1917 while 4-H via Extension programs at land grant universities has its roots in the Smith-Lever Act of 1914. Extension via 4-H youth programming work with schools in a variety methods. Sometimes this is with ag science instructors and other programs as well.

Recently the North Putnam High School food science room was shared allowing yet another partnership with the 4-H Chef University program with both Bainbridge and Roachdale fourth and fifth grade students in the summer school program. Thanks to North Putnam administrators and ag science teachers for letting us use the food science classroom facility. The youth gained knowledge in preparing food safely with proper sanitation, kitchen practices and also with the experience of cooking six different recipes for classroom sampling. Skills like reading and following a recipe, finding materials and tools to prepare items, international connections of food, and healthy nutrition on a budget were additional items presented to students.

A few weeks back, an investment program reaching nearly 90 students via Greencastle Middle School and Greencastle High School students occurred where students were given a virtual $100K portfolio to manage using an online program made available by the Indiana Council for Economic Education. Thanks to GMS/GHS business teacher Brittany Labhart for allowing this partnership to occur where weekly between March and mid-May, various investment topics were presented and students shared trading experiences or thoughts about the market.

Extension staff conduct numerous programs at county schools and are very involved with youth education throughout the year. Nature of Teaching and Captain Cash are two other examples where the ag natural resources educator and health and human science Extension educators and county Extension education coordinator teach in classrooms and afterschool events. School admin, teachers and home school groups are welcomed to contact Extension staff to begin planning for the next school year and schedule programs for the next school year.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

June 27 – YQCA Putnam 4-H, 6pm, register https://yqcaprogram.org/

June 27 – Photography 4-H Workshop, York Auto Bldg, Fairgrounds 7:30 pm

June 29 – Exploring 4-H Field Day, see 4honline email

June 30 – Public Speaking Demonstration and Summer Judging 4-H contests, Fairgrounds, 5 pm.

July 12 – Forest Management and Selling Timber webinar, 12pm, register at https://women4theland.org/upcoming-events

July 12 – FairEntry.com deadline for all 4-H projects (except rabbits July 16) entered for county fair

July 22-29 – Putnam County 4-H Fair

 

All day vacation bible school on June 25

Access Church of Cloverdale (located at 501 North Main Street, Cloverdale, IN) is holding an all day Vacation Bible School on June 25, 2022 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM with registration beginning at 8:30 AM.

 

This will be an exciting and interactive learning experience for all children aged pre-k to 6th grade.  This year’s VBS is The Mighty God; God leads Moses and Me.

 

For more information or to pre-register your child, call Meghan Ray at 812-585-2585.

Putnamville United Methodist Church hosts ice cream social

On Sunday, June 26, 2022 from 12:30-2:30 PM you can join the Putnamville United Methodist Church at the historic Putnamville United Methodist Church, on the Putnamville Public Green (corner of State Road 243 and Highway 40) for their annual Ice Cream Social. Listed on the Register of Historic Places, this church was built in 1834. For a goodwill donation, you can enjoy Bainbridge Dari-Ette ice cream, hot dogs, pies, drinks, and more. The UMW will also hold a bake sale at the social, with music provided by musicians of Gobin UM Church.

 

You are also invited to tour the 1884 Dr. Horn Office/Putnamville Museum and the Townsend/Layman Museum; an 1828 reconstructed Summer Kitchen for the Townsend Inn and former residence of freed slaves. The museums are located directly north of the church on the Putnamville Public Green. Canned goods for the Putnam County Emergency Food Pantry will be gratefully accepted. Additional parking is available at Abundant Life Baptist Church at the southwest corner of SR 243 and Hwy 40.

Common pond issues

During the summer, Purdue Extension handles a lot of issues that landowners face. These issues range from insect problems, plant problems, nuisance wildlife, and pond problems. When it comes to pond issues, most of these problems are algae and pond weeds.   

There are three main types of algae. The first is microscopic algae (commonly thought of as blue-green algae). It appears to look like a swirl of green or yellow-green oil floating on top of the pond. Microscopic algae often occur when there is an abundant of nutrients. To control this problem, it is best to prevent excess nutrients from entering the pond.

Mat-forming algae is the second type of algae. It is commonly referred to as moss. It will grow in mats around the edges and bottoms of the pond starting in the spring. The final type of algae is Chara. Chara is often a calcified, brittle plant that is rooted. Most algae problems can be controlled by using copper products. However, you should not use copper products if there are trout or koi found in the pond.

Duckweed and watermeal are two free-floating plants that can wreak havoc on a pond. These two plants are extremely small (duckweed is 1/8 to ¼ inch in diameter). You can tell these two plants apart by looking for roots. Duckweed has small roots that hang in the water while watermeal has no roots. Both of these plants can completely cover a pond and cause oxygen depletion to occur.

Waterlilies, watershield, and American pondweed are three examples of rooted-floating plants. Each of these plants have underground stems, call rhizomes, from where new plants sprout. The leaves and flowers of these species then float on top of the water. American pondweed has long slender leaves that are 2 to 3 inches long. They will then be attached to their roots by long petioles. Waterlilies and watershield are similar in appearance. However, you can tell them apart since watershield has smaller leaves and petioles that are attached in the center of the leave.

Individuals with pond problems are welcome to contact Purdue Extension to schedule a site visit or submit photos for identification (send to smith535@purdue.edu). Once you have the issue identified, we can discuss control options and if an aquatic herbicide should be used. Please remember whenever utilizing an aquatic herbicide, you need to read and follow all label instructions.

For more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution. All times listed are Eastern Time.

 

Upcoming Events:

June 15 – “What’s the Deal with Diets?” program, free, 5pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

June 15 – YQCA Putnam 4-H, 1pm, register https://yqcaprogram.org/

June 17 – Summer PARP, 9 am, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

June 27 – YQCA Putnam 4-H, 6pm, register https://yqcaprogram.org/

July 12 – Forest Management and Selling Timber webinar, 12 pm, register at
               https://women4theland.org/upcoming-events

July 22-29 – Putnam County 4-H Fair

Be Aware of Poison Hemlock

 

You do not have to travel for very long within Putnam County to see poison hemlock growing. Poison hemlock is a biennial plant that can grow up to 10 feet tall during its second year of life. During year two, it will bloom. The flowers of poison hemlock are small and white and they are found in an umbrella-shaped cluster on top of the plant. The leaves are fern-like. Poison hemlock is currently blooming in Putnam County. The stem of poison hemlock will have purple spots on it and be hairless.  

It is important to know how to identify poison hemlock because it is highly poisonous and can be fatal to humans and livestock when consumed. If a human would touch it, they can develop major skin irritations. This can even incur if you mow the plant down. Poison hemlock easily invades areas around roads, streams, trails, ditches, forest edges, and waste areas.

If you think you may have poison hemlock on your property, do not touch it. Take a photo of the plant (entire plant) and an up-close photo of the stem. You can then email the photos to smith535@purdue.edu for identification and information on how to control it. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution.

 

Mission and Vision Focus

Experiences in 4-H and with Extension programs vary and most individuals have their favorite area of activity. Sometimes one can become so wrapped up in their favorite Extension and 4-H activity that they forget about the other areas of entire program. In other situations, individuals may want the program to have objectives that align well with mission and vision statements while other times individuals may have personal objectives that do not align with program mission and vision statements. Both Purdue Extension and Indiana 4-H have their own mission and vision statements. Let’s take a look at these statements:

Indiana 4-H Mission: The Indiana 4-H Youth Development mission is to provide real-life educational opportunities that develop young people who will have a positive impact in their communities and the world.

Indiana 4-H Vision: Indiana 4-H Youth Development s?trives to be the premier, community-based program empowering young people to reach their full potential.

Purdue Extension Mission: We deliver practical, research-based information that enhances lives and livelihoods.

Purdue Extension Vision: We will be a leader in providing relevant, high-impact educational programs that transform the lives and livelihoods of individuals and communities in Indiana and the world.

As we enter the summer time period with exhibit competitions, keep these statements in mind. The real-life educational experiences for youth working on projects and activities will be memorable for them if they are allowed to take ownership and be engaged. Parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles and other relatives, it is fine to help give ideas to youth who seek guidance but please don’t do the project and take this great opportunity away from the youth.

In the adult exhibitions, you will have great opportunities to use practical and research-based information you have learned from Extension programs and other life experiences to demonstrate how your life and livelihood has been advanced.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

June 15 – “What’s the Deal with Diets?” program, free, 5pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

June 15 – YQCA Putnam 4-H, 1pm, register https://yqcaprogram.org/

June 17 – Summer PARP, 9am, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

June 27 – YQCA Putnam 4-H, 6pm, register https://yqcaprogram.org/

July 12 – Forest Management and Selling Timber webinar, 12pm, register at https://women4theland.org/upcoming-event

Better Business Bureau's Torch Awards returns to central Indiana

Better Business Bureau® will once again host its prestigious recognition event, the Torch Awards for Ethics.

 

The BBB is accepting nominations now through Sunday, June 12.  

 

Four award categories will recognize recipients as exemplary businesses, charities or individuals. “We’re thrilled to recognize exemplary members of our incredible community,” said Cathy Armour, BBB President and CEO. “Here in central Indiana, we have so many remarkable individuals and organizations who deserve to be recognized and celebrated for their outstanding practices.” 

 

Any for-profit or non-profit organizations and individuals within BBB Central Indiana’s 46-county service area are eligible. While BBB Accreditation is not required, all entrants must have been in business for at least three years, met all their financial obligations, and have at least a “B” rating with the BBB.

 

Entries will be evaluated by an independent panel of esteemed judges from business communities across central Indiana.? ? 

 

To be considered, an initial nomination must be submitted by Sunday, June 12. The process is free and easy. To make a nomination, or learn more about the celebration, visit the Torch Awards section on BBB.org or call (317) 488-2222.?? 

 

Safe Home Food Preservation Practices

Canning is easy right? Maybe think again. Canning our produce is hard work, but definitely worth it. Home growers and preservers should be knowledgeable on the topic of home food preservation. With food preservation, the first step is understanding food safety practices. First, one must start by checking your equipment and supplies. Proper equipment in good condition is required for safe, high quality home canned food. Also, it is vital to make sure that you are following up-to-date and safe canning practices. Things have changed, and what has been followed in year’s past, may not be best practice.

Another must is reliable, up-to-date canning instructions. Publications and information are available at your county Extension office, or on the National Center for Home Food Preservation website. The current edition of the USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning is on www.homefoodpreservation.net and can be purchased through Purdue Extension-Education Store. A series of food preservation publications, Let’s Preserve are downloadable through the Education Store also. The University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service also sells So Easy to Preserve, a comprehensive book with information on all types of home food preservation. Copies of this book are available for $20 at the Extension office.

Planning ahead can save you time, money, and frustration with home canning. Make it a happy, successful canning season by getting prepared before your harvest is ready. Dial gauges should be tested annually for accuracy. You may bring your pressure canner lid with your dial gage attached to the office. Please call 765-653-8411or email sampsona@purdue.edu to schedule an appointment. The cost for dial gauge testing is $5.00.

If you are looking for more in-depth (and hands-on) education and training on home food preservation, consider attending the “Mastering Home Food Preservation” training at Purdue University this June. Participants of this course will learn about food safety and freezing food, boiling water canning, pressure canning, pickling and drying foods, and jams and jellies. The cost of the course is $200, and one must register here: https://cvent.me/lPzqov. Participants will receive a notebook, and several take-home food products. Only most current recommendations will be covered. If you are interested in a more local food preservation workshop, please contact the Extension office to be connected with future local programs.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

Upcoming Events

June 1 – 4-H Roundup registration deadline for grades 7-9, contact Extension office

June 2 – Management of Pastures & Forages, 6pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

June 15 – “What’s the Deal with Diets?” program, free, 5pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

June 15 – YQCA Putnam 4-H, 1pm, register https://yqcaprogram.org/

June 17 – Summer PARP, 9am, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

June 27 – YQCA Putnam 4-H, 6pm, register https://yqcaprogram.org/

July 12 – Forest Management and Selling Timber webinar, 12pm, register at https://women4theland.org/upcoming-events

Parks and Recreation department adjusts Greencastle Aquatic Center summer schedule due to decrease in number of lifeguard staff

The Greencastle Parks and Recreation office is adjusting its summer schedule due to a decrease in the number of lifeguards on staff. A number of lifeguards have withdrawn from consideration. If additional lifeguards are hired the schedule could be adjusted accordingly.

 

The Greencastle Aquatic Center opens Wednesday, June 1.

 

Summer Schedule:

Monday: closed

Tuesday: closed

Wednesday: Noon to 7PM

Thursday: Noon to 7PM

Friday: Noon to 7PM

Saturday: Noon to 7PM

Sunday: Noon to 7PM

 

Bob York Splash Park: 10AM to 8PM

Adult Lap Swim and Tot Time: Wednesday to Saturday, 11AM to Noon

Water Aerobics: Saturday, 11AM to Noon

Kids Fishing Derby June 4, 2022

Children, ages 2-17 years, are invited to participate in a Kid’s Fishing Derby, presented by Greencastle Parks and Recreation on June 4, 2022 at Jaycee Park.

 

Registration will open at 7:30 am with the contest beginning at 8:00 am. Or, you can register online www.greencstleparks.com.

 

Weigh-ins will continue throughout the day. Prizes for the event winners are provided by Greencastle Hometown Auto Sales.

 

 

Rules of thumb for managing pastures

Livestock producers have the continual task of evaluating their pastures to ensure they have adequate plant stands for their animals to graze. When evaluating, you need to take an inventory of the plants and evaluate their growth.

When taking the inventory, take note of the different types of forages in the field, the amount of each forage present, and types and amount of weeds present. There are two rules of thumb to follow when assessing your pasture stand.  They are:

  1. Less than 10% of the soil should be visible in a cool-season grass or cool-season grass/legume pasture.
  2. There should be 2 legume plants per square foot in a grass-legume pasture.

If either of those rules of thumbs are not met, then you may want to consider renovating your pasture. If weeds, including toxic plants, are found, you should take appropriate steps to eradicate or control them. However, those steps cannot be taken until you successfully identify the plant of concern.

When allowing your animals to graze, you want to make sure you do not overgraze the pasture. When determining if the animals have grazed that field long enough, there are two rules of thumb to follow. They are:

  1. Leave 3 or 4 inches of cool-season grasses after grazing.
  2. Leave 6 to 8 inches of warm-season grasses after grazing.

Once you reach either of the height suggestions, you would remove the animals from that field and put them in another field to graze. This process is referred to as rotational grazing. It may seem like you are leaving a lot of useable forages in the field, but plants will recover much faster if a larger amount of leaf surface remains to grow from.

If you would like to know more about how to evaluate your pasture and forage fields to determine if they need renovated, then you may want to attend the Management of Pastures & Forages program scheduled for June 2nd at the Putnam County Fairgrounds – Harris Hall Building. This program will start at 6:00 pm. In addition to discussing how to evaluate your pastures & forage fields, this program will also cover how to identify toxic plants in your fields. If you would like to attend, please register by June 1st by calling 765-653-8411 or emailing smith535@purdue.edu.

Purdue Extension Office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution. All times listed are Eastern Time.

 

Upcoming Events:

May 24 – Turning Your Lawn to Garden webinar, 12 pm, register at
                https://women4theland.org/upcoming-events

May 30 – Extension Office closed in observance of Memorial Day

June 2 – Management of Pastures & Forages, 6 pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

June 17 – Summer PARP, 9 am, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

July 12 – Forest Management and Selling Timber webinar, 12 pm, register at
               https://women4theland.org/upcoming-events

New law for home-based vendors

If you sell food to an end consumer in the state of Indiana, you are either established as a Retail Food Establishment or a Home-Based Vendor. Most individuals who sell goods at farmer’s markets or roadside stands are operating under home-based vendors laws. Indiana recently passed a new law (HB 1149) which includes changes that will impact all persons operating as a home-based vendor. This article will help you understand who qualifies as a home-based vendor, which foods home-based vendors are allowed to sell and what has changed in the new law.

Who is a home-based vendor?

Pursuant to newly enacted (effective 7/1/22) code: IC 16-42-5.3, “A home based vendor shall prepare and sell only a food product that is:

  • made, grown, or raised by an individual at the individual's primary residence, including any permanent structure that is on the same property as the residence;
  • not a potentially hazardous food product;
  • prepared using proper sanitary procedures;
  • not resold; (e.g. you must sell to the end user not someone who intends to resell; if you did this you must be licensed as a wholesaler).

What products may a home-based vendor sell?

Home-based vendors are allowed to sell non-potentially hazardous foods. Non-potentially hazardous foods are those that do not require refrigeration for food safety. This list of allowable foods has not changed and includes:

  • Baked items
  • Candy and confections
  • Produce, whole and uncut
  • Tree nuts, legumes
  • Pickles processed in a traditional method (e.g. fermentation)
  • Honey, molasses, sorghum, maple syrup
  • Mushrooms grown as a product of agriculture (wild mushrooms should be certified)
  • Traditional jams, jellies and preserves made from high-acid fruits and using full sugar recipes (This is the only home-canned food allowed.)

Exceptions:

  • In-shell chicken eggs can be sold if you are registered under and follow the guidelines of the Indiana State Egg Board
  • Poultry and Rabbit
    • Must be frozen at point of sale if sold at farmers’ markets or roadside stands
    • Must be refrigerated if sold on-farm
    • Contact Indiana State Board of Animal Health (BOAH) for further specifics
  • Eggs, poultry and rabbit may only be sold at farmer's markets and roadside stands

What has changed under the new law?

Two major changes under the new law include 1) how and where products can be sold and 2) the addition of requirements for food handler training.

  1. How or where can a home-based vendor sell products? Home-based vendors may now sell their product:
  • in person, by telephone, or through the Internet; and
  • delivered to the end consumer in person, by mail, or by a third-party carrier
  • sale and delivery is limited to within the state of Indiana
  • this does not apply to eggs, poultry and rabbit which may only be sold at farmer's markets and roadside stands

 

  1. All home-based vendors must “obtain a food handler certificate from a certificate issuer that is accredited by the American National Standards Institute” (ANSI). ServSafe Food Handler training fulfills this requirement. This certification is valid for three years. You have two training options to fulfill this requirement.
  • The Purdue Extension Food Safety Team is preparing a series of in-person food handler trainings. Call your local Purdue Extension office or visit purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops to find classes as they are scheduled.
  • For those who prefer an online option, the ServSafe Food Handler training can be taken online at www.servsafe.com

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

May 18 – African Violets & the Gesneriad Family Webinar, 7 pm, register at https://tinyurl.com/afviolet22    

May 23 – Container Gardening 101, Roachdale Community & Senior Center, 2 pm, register by calling 765-653-8411

May 24 – Turning Your Lawn to Garden webinar, 12 pm, register at https://women4theland.org/upcoming-events

Greencastle Schools times, locations to serve summer meals

Greencastle School Foodservice along with USDA will sponsor Free Healthy Meals this summer in the Greencastle area.

 

Summer meals will be served to all children 18 and under FREE of charge this Summer. 

 

Please check the Greencastle web site for menus - www.greencastle.k12.in.us .

 

Middle School 

6-1-22 thru 7-1-22

Breakfast: 9:00-9:30  

Lunch: 11:30-12:15

 

Ridpath

5-31-22 thru 7-15-22

Breakfast : 8:00-9:00   

Lunch: 11:00-12:00

 

Elite Skyhawks (1101 N. Jackson Street)

6-1-22 thru 7-15-22

Breakfast:  7:45-8:30 

Lunch 11:00-12:00

 

Robe-Ann Park     

6-1-22 thru 7-15-22

Lunch   11:00-12:30

Shelter House #2 by Skate park.

 

Deer Meadow

6-1-22 thru 7-1-22

Breakfast: 9:00-9:30   

Lunch 11:30-12:30

 

No meals will be served on July 4th

Meals must be consumed on site.

Adults may purchase breakfast $4.00 / lunch $5.00

 

For more information contact Ms. Carrico, Director of Foodservice @ 653-3725.

 

 

4-H Youth Programming More Than You Know

From time to time parents will comment about the cost of feed for animals or making things for 4-H projects. Often that is followed by comment “well it is still cheaper than sports” type of comment. Hopefully most are doing 4-H for the fun way to learn life, career, and interpersonal skills. But what if you could learn to invest and actually make money via the 4-H program?

Well now that is actually happening. For the second year through school programs, youth have been learning about investing using mutual funds, stocks, bonds and relative to a traditional savings account. Nearly 90 youth were virtually given $100 thousand to invest where they started making trades early March. These students have seen a lot of market conditions in this very short time.

Students learned about ticker symbols, risk management, diversification, dividends, capital gains, sectors, rule of 72 for doubling funds and the grid of capitalization with value to growth focuses. It is so important to understand that placing funds in an account that pays an interest rate of 0.05% when inflation runs 7 percent per year results in a loss of buying power of 6.95% each year. The goal of the program is to help students learn to save and to grow savings wisely through being successful investors. Too many are scared of investments due to lack of knowledge. This program gives students knowledge through hands on skill development to become more powerful investors. Future goals include developing a youth investment club that would actually manage real fund dollars.

Last year there were just 30 students in the program and where they left the program last spring can still be tracked. Despite the poor market conditions of 2022, only two would have a loss today based on their positions, with one being less than a percent and the other losing roughly 10 percent. A year later the other 28 students would have all been better positioned than having their funds in a basic savings account. Of those 28, six would be sitting on double digit gains while 14 students would have seen positions grow by 5 percent. Time is such an important aspect of investing.

This week students will be recognized for successes in Mrs. Labhart’s classes and photo’s will be forthcoming. If your class would like to participate in a future event, please contact the Extension office to schedule. Additionally, the goal is to develop a 4-H investment club so please contact Mark Evans at the Extension office if you would like to become involved.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

May 18 – African Violets & the Gesneriad Family Webinar, 7 pm, register at https://tinyurl.com/afviolet22  

May 23 – Container Gardening 101, Roachdale Community & Senior Center, 2 pm, register by calling 765-653-8411

May 24 – Turning Your Lawn to Garden webinar, 12 pm, register at https://women4theland.org/upcoming-events

Putnam County Public Library May 4th Star Wars event

It may not be in a galaxy far, far away, but it will be a battle between good and evil and Star Wars themed regardless on May 4 at the Putnam County Public Library.

 

The library will be conducting a Star Wars themed May the 4th Celebration, which will feature related snacks, crafts and activities for padawans of all ages. The event is an all-ages event and people can attend in a costume. Festivities will be held from 5 p.m. until 7 p.m.

 

For Putnam County Public Library executive Matt McClelland, the event is a special one for him.

 

“We lost the last two years due to Covid, but prior to that, it is something we did. Many people come in costume, and it is cool to see. It will be my first one in person. I have seen many pictures, but I am excited to see it in person,” McClelland said.

 

McClelland said he is optimistic the turnout will be “big.”

 

“This is tremendous and allows us an opportunity to get back in touch with the community. Any library will tell you the keystone is personal connection. We lost that largely over the last couple of years. I am excited for events like this, our in-person summer reading program and getting back to those events. We strive to form personal connections with people. This will be a big moment for us,” McClelland said. 

Primary Election Day is Tuesday, May 3

Indiana Secretary of State Holli Sullivan is reminding Hoosiers that May 3 is Primary Election Day. On Primary Election Day, polls are open from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. local time.

 

Hoosiers can check their voting status, see polling locations, and view a sample ballot at IndianaVoters.com.

 

“Exercising the right to vote is foundational to our nation’s democracy. I hope all Hoosiers who have not had the opportunity to vote early cast their ballots on Primary Election Day,” Secretary Sullivan said. “Hoosiers can go to the polls with confidence thanks to the work of election administrators in each of Indiana’s 92 counties to ensure safe and secure elections.”

 

Thus far, more than 155,000 Hoosiers have already cast their ballots, including more than 120,000 people who have voted during Indiana’s early in-person voting period.

 

More than half of Indiana counties now offer vote centers, which allow voters to cast a ballot at any polling location in their county. A valid photo ID is required to vote.

 

Hoosiers may also call the toll-free Hoosier Voter Hotline at 866-IN-1-VOTE to speak directly to a representative for information, polling locations and to file grievances. Staff will be on hand to answer calls from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET on Election Day.

Main Street Cloverdale is hosting a book sale at Putnam County Center for Women's Ministries on May 14, 2022 at 9:00 AM

Main Street Cloverdale is hosting a book sale at Putnam County Center for Women's Ministries (CWM), located at 404 N Main Street in Cloverdale - just north of the Family Dollar store, on May 14, and it starts at 9:00 AM.

 

The sale will be held rain or shine in the basement area of the Center and refreshments will be available.

 

The titles, mostly Christian in nature, will include fiction and non-fiction, as well as educational, and will appeal to all ages.

 

CWM is a non-profit, non-denominational ministry.  Their mission is to offer HOPE to hurting women through free peer counseling for emotional and spiritual healing. They also provide support groups, Bible studies and prayer support to women within the community.

 

For more information, call the Center at 765-795-6774.

Add Flavor with Herbs and Spices

Herbs and spices add fabulous flavor and color to food without adding salt, fat or sugar. Cooking with herbs and spices is also a great way to introduce a variety of flavors to children while helping foods look more appetizing.

 

The terms “herbs” and “spices” are often used interchangeably and are sometimes referred to as “seasonings,” however they are different. Herbs are the leaves of low growing shrubs and include parsley, chives, thyme, basil, oregano, rosemary, and more. Herbs can be purchased dried, fresh or as a paste. When substituting in recipes, use the ratio of 3 fresh to 1 dried. For example, potato salad would use 3 Tbs. of fresh parsley or 1 Tbs. of dried parsley.

 

Spices come from the bark, roots, buds, seeds, berry, or fruit of plants and trees. Spices include cinnamon, ginger, onion, garlic, cloves, black pepper, paprika, and more.

 

Additional Ways to Add Flavor:

  • Seasoning blends include a mixture of spices and herbs such as seasoning salt, Italian seasoning, taco seasoning, and poultry seasoning. Check labels to see if “salt” is listed among the ingredients and opt for salt-free or lower sodium versions.
  • Rubs are a mixture of spices and can be wet or dry. Web rubs usually have a bit of oil or other moist ingredients such as mustard or yogurt added. Dry rubs are mixtures of several dry spices and herbs that are worked into the surfaces of meat, poultry, or fish. They are both added to enhance flavor.
  • Marinades are used to add flavor and tenderize meats and poultry. They generally contain herbs and spices, oil, and an acid such as yogurt, citrus juice, or vinegar.

 

Experiment with Herbs and Spices:

  • Add fresh mint and lemon to a glass of ice water.
  • Omit the salt when cooking pasta and flavor with basil, oregano, parsley and pepper or use an Italian seasoning blend.
  • For more flavor, add spices to uncooked dishes, such as salads, several hours before serving.
  • Introduce children to herbs and spices with some easy flavor combinations such as apples with cinnamon, bananas with nutmeg and chicken with rosemary.
  • Start a small herb garden or grow a few herbs in containers. Children will love watching them grow! This time of the year is a great time to plant some herbs. Just be cautious of the drops in temperature or potential frost.

 

Approximate equivalent amounts of different forms of herbs are:

  • 1 Tbs. finely cut fresh herbs
  • 1 tsp. crumbled dried herbs
  • 1/4 to 1/2 tsp.ground dried herbs

 

Source: Nebraska Extension

 

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

Upcoming Events

April 30 – Plant Auction, 10 am start, Fairgrounds

May 3 – Extension Office closed for Election Day

May 18 – African Violets & the Gesneriad Family Webinar, 7 pm, register at https://tinyurl.com/afviolet22  

May 23 – Container Gardening 101, Roachdale Community & Senior Center, 2 pm, register by calling 765-653-8411

May 24 – Turning Your Lawn to Garden webinar, 12 pm, register at https://women4theland.org/upcoming-events

Arts Council to sponsor bus trip to Haan Museum of Art, May 26

Greencastle Arts Council is hitting the road for its maiden bus trip to the historic Haan Museum of Indiana Art in Lafayette on May 26. Tickets, including museum admission and roundtrip transportation on a professional, restroom-equipped Turner motor coach, are $40. Seating is limited, so patrons are encouraged to purchase their tickets from a board member by the GAC’s next monthly meeting at the Putnam County Public Library on Monday, May 2.

 

GAC plans to arrive in Lafayette at approximately 10 a.m. by meeting at 8 a.m. in the Putnam County Museum parking lot at 110 N. Jackson Street in Greencastle and departing Greencastle at 8:30 am. After viewing the exhibits and sculpture garden, next stop will be The Town & Gown Bistro in West Lafayette for a savory lunch and to say hello to owner Matt O’Neill, former chef at The Walden Inn. Cultivated and well-fed, the party will arrive back in Greencastle at about 4 p.m.

 

The Haan Museum, which is known for an exceptional collection of Hoosier painting and pottery, is housed in a 16,000 square feet mansion, along with a major collection of antique 19th-century American furniture. Originally built to house the Connecticut state pavilion at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair, the home was modeled to represent a 1760s-gentleman’s country home. It also was designed with the intent of being auctioned off and relocated after the fair. As the buyers were Mr. and Mrs. William Potter, its final destination was Lafayette, where it was known for many years as Potter Mansion.

 

“The core of the museum’s permanent collection is an impressive body of the best works of T.C. Steele, the Hoosier Group and the Brown County Art Colony, collected over time by Ellie and Bob Haan, who later purchased the mansion from the Potters,” said board member Lane Ralph, coordinator of the trip. “The special show that we’ll be seeing, the ‘Generations: Fine Art Sale and Exhibition,’ is a selection of premier pieces by ten painters currently working in Indiana, some of which also are for sale.”

 

Ralph continued, “This is the first time the GAC has organized a bus trip, so it is a bit of an experiment to sound out whether there is an audience in Putnam County for occasional cultural excursions like this.”

 

As seating is limited to 36 passengers, interested individuals are asked to purchase their tickets from a board member by the GAC’s next monthly meeting at the Putnam County Public Library on Monday, May 2. Alternatively, they may mail their payment to the Greencastle Arts Council (P.O. Box 631, Greencastle IN 46135). Enter “Bus Trip” in the memo line of the check. For additional information visit the GAC website (greencastleartscouncil.org) or contact Lane Ralph at lane@greencastleartscouncil.org or (765) 721-1519.

Putnam County Mural Festival receives $25,000 grant

The Putnam County Mural Project recently announced its participation in the CreatINg Places grant through the Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority (IHCDA). This grant will help fund the first-ever Putnam County Mural Festival this fall. In order to receive the $25,000 match through the IHCDA program, the group must first raise $25,000 from the community by the June 5 deadline.

 

So far, the group has already secured a $10,300 gift from 100 Men of Putnam County and a $500 gift from the Greencastle Civic League. Donations are now being sought from individuals, corporations and other nonprofits to help meet the CreatINg Places match. 

 

Another condition of the CreatINg Places matching grant is to have as many donors contribute to the campaign as possible. The festival organizers are asking for donations at any amount in order to meet the specific crowdfunding requirements that are necessary for the $25,000 match.

 

In 2019, the Putnam County Mural Project also received a grant to create one of the state’s largest murals on the silos at the intersection of Veterans Memorial Highway and U.S. Highway 231.

 

“We are lucky to have a grant like this in Indiana that helps build vibrant communities,” said Chris Flegal, leader of the Putnam County Mural Project. “We wouldn’t be able to have a festival this ambitious without their support. Now, we’re hoping that the community will get as excited as we are about this countywide festival and help us meet our match. We are looking for as many donors as possible to meet the specific campaign requirements–any amount can help us get to our match.”

 

Donations are being accepted at putnamcountymuralproject.org. Funds raised will go toward prepping the walls and paying artist stipends and materials, as well as a community block party on Sept. 23, 2022.

 

The application period for artists to submit a proposal to the Putnam County Mural Festival will close on April 24 and the selection process will begin soon. The murals will be started in mid-September and completed by Sept. 23, 2022.

 

The mural locations will include the Banner-Graphic building and Putnam County Visitors Center in Greencastle, Off the Rails alleyway and Community Park building in Roachdale, as well as Tom’s Cookies in Fillmore.

 

DePauw University & Putnam County Public Library join together to confront digital divide

Putnam County residents have long been able to receive help with their devices at the library. Now they are able to drop-in on Mondays for immediate assistance thanks to a partnership between the Putnam County Public Library and DePauw University.

 

CTEP is a DePauw-sponsored program that aims to bridge the digital divide in Putnam County by offering workshops and office hours to increase technical literacy. CTEP is now offering office hours on Mondays from 4-6 p.m. at the library.

 

The library offers additional drop-in technology assistance on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 5:30-7:30 p.m.

 

“We are excited to offer additional opportunities for our visitors to interact with new technologies, as well as learning how best to use their current devices,” said Library Director Matt McClelland.

 

The library continues to offer one-on-one help with technology and devices by appointment. To make an appointment, email atincher@pcpl21.org or call 765-301-7094. 

Master Gardener plant auction set for Saturday, April 30th

The 8th annual Putnam County Master Gardener Plant Auction will be held Saturday, April 30th at 10 AM at the Goat Barn at the Putnam County Fairgrounds. Preview is set for 9:15 AM with the auction starting at 10 AM. Flowers, ornamentals, trees, bushes and house plants will be auctioned. In addition, we will have donated garden and garden related items at our Garden Shed for sale.

The plants are donated by various local businesses and from the Putnam County Master Gardeners own gardens. If you have any plants you would like to donate to the auction please contact the Purdue Extension office by Wednesday, April 27th at 765-653-8411.

Many of the plants come from the gardens of our friends and neighbors.  This means that these plants will thrive in this area with our soil and our weather extremes.  With water and a little care, these plants will continue to be successful when they’re transplanted to new local gardens.

In addition, many of the plants at the auction were raised by Putnam County Master Gardeners--folks who are passionate about growing plants and who genuinely love to share their successes with other gardeners.

And finally, the plant auction is for a good cause.  Proceeds from the auction fund scholarships for post-secondary students who plan to major in a horticulture related field of study.

Plan to spend the morning of April 30th with other plant lovers at the 8th Annual Master Gardener Plant Auction.  Come and check out the healthy, hardy and well-loved plants that will be auctioned off.  If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Jenna Nees at smith535@purdue.edu or 765-653-8411. 

Purdue Extension Office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution. All times listed are Eastern Time.

 

Upcoming Events:

April 30 – Plant Auction, 10 am start, Fairgrounds

May 3 – Extension Office closed for Election Day

May 18 – African Violets & the Gesneriad Family Webinar, 7 pm, register at
     https://tinyurl.com/afviolet22

May 23 – Container Gardening 101, Roachdale Community & Senior Center, 2 pm, register
                by calling 765-653-8411

May 24 – Turning Your Lawn to Garden webinar, 12 pm, register at
                https://women4theland.org/upcoming-events

 

Deadline is Sunday for the September mural festival in Putnam Co.

A deadline is approaching this weekend for artists to sign up for a mural festival set for September.

 

A new mural festival, organized by the Putnam County Mural Project, will be held in September, 2022 and it is seeking artists to complete murals at five locations around the county.

 

Local, regional, and national artists are encouraged to apply by April 24.

 

The murals will need to be started in mid-September and complete by Sept. 24, 2022. The sizes of the walls range from 100 square feet to nearly 6,500 square feet and include locations in Fillmore, Greencastle and Roachdale. The full call for artists is available at www.putnamcountymuralproject.org

 

A committee will review the artists and chosen artists will be asked to work with the Putnam County Mural Project team in order to produce work that is reflective of and responsive to the Putnam County community.

 

 “We’re excited to build upon the success of our first project that brought in an internationally-recognized artist, generated national attention, and created a meaningful experience for Putnam County residents,” said Chris Flegal, leader of the volunteer group. “Our new mural festival format will allow us to engage several artists, expand our community-arts assets, and activate spaces around the entire county.”

 

The mural locations will include the Banner-Graphic building and Putnam County Visitors Center in Greencastle, Off the Rails alleyway and Community Park building in Roachdale, and Tom’s Cookies in Fillmore.

 

Greencastle Cub Scout Pack 99 will be scouting for food!

On April 24, Greencastle Cub Scout Pack 99 will be hiking around Greencastle neighborhoods leaving collection bags for nonperishable foods on porches and doorsteps. Citizens can fill the bags with nonperishable shelf-stable food items and put them back on their porch a week later.

 

On May 1, the same Cub Scouts will be returning to collect the bags of food that have been generously given. They ask the items be in the bags and back on their porches by 2:00 pm.

 

If you do not receive a bag, misplace a bag, or do not have enough room in the bag, the Cub Scout Pack will accept donated nonperishable food at Greencastle City Hall on May 1 from 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm.

 

These food items will be distributed to several Greencastle food pantries.

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