Forgot Password

Not a Member? Sign up here!

Community News Archives for 2021-10

Digging Deeper Into Land Leases

Many times, lease agreements must be negotiated in order to meet the needs and expectations for both landlords and tenants.  The Purdue Land Lease Team has developed a program that address many questions concerning land leases. Landowners and farmers can learn more about the various tools available to assist with developing a farmland lease, the impact soil may have on leases, and answers to legal questions by participating in the Purdue University Extension virtual workshop, "Digging Deeper Into Land Leases." 

This virtual workshop will be offered at two different times including Tuesday, November 16 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. EST and Thursday, November 18 from 10 a.m. to 12 pm EST.  Presenters include Purdue Extension Educators and Anthony Crowell, Attorney with Gordon & Associates.  

The workshop will cover:

  • Trends and Drivers of Farm Cash Rents and Land Values
  • Available Leasing Tools
  • Tips for Reading a Web Soil Survey
  • Ways to Incorporate Soil Health Into a lease
  • Legal Aspects of Leases

The registration fee for this workshop is $25.  Individuals wanting to participate in this virtual workshop can sign up at <https://cvent.me/gmRR08>.  The Purdue Land Lease Team will send an e-mail to the e-mail address you provide with the link to connect from your home computer, tablet or smartphone. For more information about this program, or if you need a reasonable accommodation to participate in this program, contact Jenna Nees at 765-653-8411 or smith535@purdue.edu prior to the program.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local Purdue Extension Office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution. All times listed are Eastern Time.

Upcoming Events:

November 2 – Reducing the Stress in Stress Management webinar, 12pm, register at
                        https://tinyurl.com/healthandwealthseries21

November 7 – Putnam 4-H Awards Program, 2 pm, Fairgrounds

November 10 – Kitchen Gadgets: Instant Pot & Air Fryer, 4:30pm, register at
                          https://tinyurl.com/healthandwealthseries21

November 11 – Extension Office closed for Veteran’s Day

November 15 – Diabetes & the Holidays, 10am, register at
                          https://tinyurl.com/healthandwealthseries21

November 16 – Digging Deeper Into Land Leases, 6:30 pm, virtual, $25, register at:
                          https://cvent.me/gmRR08

November 17 – Insights From Consumer Research That You Can Take Home To The
                          Farm webinar, 12 pm register at https://tinyurl.com/WIAWebinars21

November 17 – ServSafe 1-Day Class and Online Exam, 9am-4pm, register at
                          https://purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

November 18 - Digging Deeper Into Land Leases, 10:00 am, virtual, $25, register at:
                         https://cvent.me/gmRR08

November 22 – Curb the Urge to Splurge on Holiday Spending, 2pm, register at
                          https://tinyurl.com/healthandwealthseries21

November 22, 29 & Dec. 6, 13 – Know Your Numbers, Know Your Options, 10 am, virtual,
                                                    $20, register at: https://cvent.me/n24R23

Putnam County yard waste site closing October 30

The Putnam County Yard Waste drop-off site, located at 2363 S County Rd 250 W, Greencastle (past the County Highway Department & the Police Firing Range) will be closing for the season on Saturday, October 30.
 
Residents of Putnam and Parke counties are urged to take advantage of the warm weather to clean up yard trimmings and debris before the site closes for the year.

The site is open Monday's & Wednesday's noon-6pm, and Saturdays 9am – 3pm.
 
The site will reopen next Spring on April 2, 2022.
 
Residents can call West Central Solid Waste District with specific questions at 765-653-2150. Businesses and contractors are prohibited from using the site.


Can You Eat your Jack-O-Lantern Pumpkin?

Its fall and thoughts turn to pumpkins! Can that large pumpkin sitting on your front porch still be used for eating? Sure — as long as it is in good condition and hasn't' yet been carved. Pumpkins typically used for jack-o'-lanterns usually are larger, with stringier pulp and more watery flesh. However, you can still eat the jack-o-lantern variety with fairly good results.

If you're buying a pumpkin specifically for eating, the smaller ones are usually the best. These sugar or pie pumpkins generally are sweeter, less stringy and have a deeper, richer color. Pumpkin seeds from any pumpkin can also be dried and roasted.

How do you prepare fresh pumpkin for making a pumpkin pie or pumpkin bread?

  1. Wash hands with soap and water.
  2. Wash the outer surface of the pumpkin thoroughly before cutting to remove any surface dirt that could be transferred to the inside of the pumpkin. Remove the stem with a sharp knife.
  3. Cut the pumpkin in half to make it easier to scoop out the seeds and scrape away the stringy mass. Cut the pumpkin into chunks.
  4. Cook until soft in boiling water, in steam, in a pressure cooker, in a microwave or in an oven. Check for doneness by poking with a fork.
  5. Drain the cooked pumpkin. Remove pulp from rind and mash. To cool, place pan containing pumpkin in cold water and stir occasionally. Refrigerate and use within 3 to 4 days.
  6. Pumpkin puree freezes well. Measure cooled puree into one cup portions. Place in zip closure bags or rigid freezer containers. Leave a half inch of space at the top of the containers. Label and date each container. Freeze for up to one year. Use the puree in recipes or substitute in recipes calling for canned pumpkin in the same amount.

Many people are interested in how to roast pumpkin seeds during the fall months. Here are some tips from the National Center for Home Food Preservation:

Drying seeds and roasting seeds are two different steps.

  1. To dry: carefully wash pumpkin seeds to remove the clinging fibrous pumpkin tissue. Pumpkin seeds can be dried in a dehydrator at 115 to 120°F for 1 to 2 hours, or in an oven on warm for 3 to 4 hours. Stir frequently to avoid scorching.
  2. To roast: toss dried pumpkin seeds with oil and your favorite seasonings such as salt, pepper, garlic or cumin. Roast in a preheated oven at 250°F for 10 to 15 minutes. Once cooled, place the roasted pumpkin seeds in a sealed container and store at room temperature.

Source: Home Preserving Pumpkin and Drying Pumpkin Seeds, National Center for Home Food Preservation

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

October 19 & 26 – Fall Walking Group, 9am, Big Walnut Sports Park, register at 765-301-7641

October 19 – Pork: The No Hogwash Protein webinar, 12 pm register at https://tinyurl.com/WIAWebinars21

October 25 – ServSafe 1-Day Class and Online Exam, 9am-4pm, register at https://purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops 

October 27 – November 3, 10, 17 – Grass to Garden Program, virtual, 6 – 9 pm, $50, register at 765-653-8411

November 7 – Putnam 4-H Awards Program, 2 pm, Fairgrounds.

November 11 – Extension Office closed for Veteran’s Day

Halloween in Putnam County

It’s that time of year again; time to dress in costume, have fun, and ask for candy. Halloween is happening all over Putnam county and now you know the what, where, and when to plan your festivities.

 

Greencastle

Door-to-door residential trick or treating will be Sunday, October 31, 2021 from 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm.

 

Saturday

30-Oct-21

9 AM – 5 PM

Putnam County Public Library--103 East poplar Street, Greencastle

Trick-or-Treat @ The Library

Annual Halloween event at the library. They will have books for children and teens, as well as some tasty treats for everyone! Drop by for your book and treat. 

Saturday

30-Oct-21

12-2pm

York Automotive

Trunk or Treat at York Automotive

 

Saturday

30-Oct-21

1-3pm

Putnam Plaza

Shops of Putnam Plaza Drive-thru Trick or Treat

Monicals, Healthies, Mason Jewelers, TSC, TCU, Anytime Fitness, Shoe Sensation

Saturday

30-Oct-21

1 PM – 4 PM

DePauw Campus Farm--1138 W. Walnut St. Greencastle IN

Treats & Treasures

Join the Office of Sustainability and community partners in celebrating our bountiful fall harvest! Enjoy free produce, live music, lawn games, local art and food vendors, and more at this family-friendly event open to the public.
Arrive at noon to participate in a guided hike through the Nature Park! The festival will take place from 1-4pm and will have crafts and activities for all ages.
The first 40 guests to arrive will be able to enjoy free food truck food from Black Leaf.
NOTE: A home football game is happening the same day. Limited parking is available at the Campus Farm, guests are encouraged to park on a campus lot and walk/bike to the festival if able. Two walking routes are available near the athletic fields, driving access only available by Walnut St. Blackstock parking will be closed due to tailgating.
*Masks required inside the Ullem Center*

Saturday

30-Oct-21

5-8pm

Cloverdale United Methodist Church ad Train Up A Child Daycare--364 West Robert Weist (Burma Road)

Annual Trunk or Treat

 

Saturday

30-Oct-21

6 PM – 7:30 PM

First Baptist Church Greencastle--404 Judson Dr, Greencastle

Treats & Treasures

Safe Trick or Treating during Greencastle Community's Trick or Treating time

 

Cloverdale

Door-to-door residential trick or treating will be October 30, 2021 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm.

The Chili, back the blue fest will run from 11:00 am to 5:00 pm with trick or treating following and a trunk or treat at 5pm at the Cloverdale High School.

 

Reelsville

Saturday

30-Oct-21

5 PM – 7 PM

Reelsville/Washington Township VFD

Trunk Or Treat

We thought this would be a fun event for the kids since the Chili Supper is the night before Halloween. This will be held in the parking lot near the school

 

North Putnam

Both Bainbridge and Roachdale door-to-door residential trick or treating will be held October 30, 2021 from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm.

Tuesday

19-Oct-21

6-7:30 pm

North Putnam High School/Middle School parking lot

Trunk or Treat

 

 

Special

Saturday

23-Oct-21

2-4:00 pm

Indiana Sheriff’s Youth Ranch--5325 North State Road 59, Brazil, IN

FREE Pumpkin Painting

Free pumpkins, paints, cupcakes, and apple cider will be sponsored by Clay County Sheriff Paul Harden and Putnam County Sheriff Scott Stockton

 


Putnamville State Police post safety tips for avoiding deer on the roadway

It’s that time of year again for drivers to be aware of deer darting into and crossing the roadways.  The Putnamville State Police Post would like to pass along a few safety tips to help you avoid a possible collision with a deer this year.  

 

  • Be cautious while driving during dusk or dawn hours 

Deer are most active at dawn and dusk, but can appear at any time, especially during the mating season, which is in full swing from October through December. Please remember though that deer can appear at any time.  Ensure that you and your passengers are wearing seat belts at all times, in case you need to make a sudden stop. 

 

  • Pay attention to deer crossing signs

Be alert and observe your surroundings for any signs of deer while on the road. Deer are abundant in forested areas, so it’s important to drive cautiously even if you’re no longer in a deer-crossing zone.

 

  • Stay alert if you spot a deer

Deer tend to travel in packs so if you see one deer, slow down and proceed with caution, be prepared for more to follow.  If you see a deer, slow down, tap your brakes to warn others, or flash your lights and sound your horn to warn other motorists. It will give everyone an opportunity to slow down. 

 

  • Take precautions when driving at night

If there is no oncoming traffic, turn on your bright lights: You’ll not only be able to see clearer, but you’ll have a greater chance of spotting a deer from a distance and allow you to react accordingly. 

 

  • Don’t swerve to avoid hitting a deer

Do not swerve to avoid a deer collision. By swerving you put yourself at risk for a worse collision with another motorist or running off the roadway.  Brake firmly and stay in your lane.  

 

  • Report the deer-vehicle collision

If you happen to get involved in an accident, contact local authorities to report it so you can get an accident report for your insurance company.  

Remember deer are unpredictable and could dart into traffic at any time, so be alert at all times! 

Putnam County Public Library to host Conversation with Author Kevin McKelvey

On Thursday, October 28, at 6:00 pm, you can head to the Putnam County Public Library for Author Kevin McKelvey.  

 

McKelvey is a place-based poet, writer, designer, and social practice artist. He teaches at the University of Indianapolis and directs the M.A. in Social Practice Art and oversees the undergraduate major in Environmental Sustainability. He founded the Etchings Press, which is a student-ran publisher. He contributes to numerous interdisciplinary efforts for the student and the community, including helping to start a community garden and microfarm.

 

Kevin McKelvey was a 2020 Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana Authors Award honoree and is participating in the conversation at the Library as part of the Indiana Authors Awards Speaker Program, powered by Indiana Humanities and made possible through the generosity of Glick Philanthropies.

 

“We are grateful to Indiana Humanities, Glick Philanthropies, and Kevin McKelvey for making this event possible,” said Adult Services & Programs Manager Amber Compton. “The library is always excited for the opportunity to open conversations in the community and share the astounding works of Indiana’s writers.”

 

If you would like more information about the library services, programs, or collections, you can visit pcpl21.org, call 765-653-2755, or stop by Monday through Thursday from 9:00 am to 8:00 pm and Friday and Saturday from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm.


Red Cross enters third week of emergency blood shortage

The American Red Cross continues to experience an emergency blood shortage that has caused the blood supply to drop to the lowest post-summer level in at least six years.

 

With less than a day’s supply of certain blood types in recent weeks, the Red Cross asks donors of all blood types – especially type O −to make an appointment to give blood as soon as possible to ensure patients can receive the lifesaving transfusions they rely on. Appointments can be made by using the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting RedCrossBlood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).

 

Fall is typically a time when the blood supply rebounds from summer blood shortages, but asurge in COVID-19 cases across the U.S. due to the delta variant has contributed to the lowest donor turnout of the year.To shore up inventory, the Red Cross must collect 10,000 additional blood products each week this month to meet hospital and patient needs.

 

Donors are asked to make an appointment

All those who come to donate in October will receive a link by email to claim a free Zaxby’s® Signature Sandwich reward or get a $5 e-gift card to a merchant of their choice.*Plus, all those who come to give Oct. 11-31 will receive a bonus $5 e-gift card to a merchant of their choice.**

 

Blood donations help those with breast cancer

During Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October, the Red Cross is reminding donors of the importance of blood to those undergoing treatment. According to the National Cancer Institute, roughly 1.9 million people are expected to be diagnosed with cancer in the U.S. this year, and more than 281,000 of those individuals will have breast cancer.

 

Patients with breast cancer and other cancers may need blood products on a regular basis during chemotherapy, surgery or treatment for complications. In fact, nearly 25% of the blood supply is used by cancer patients. 

 

People across the country depend on the kindness of blood donors. Donors are urged to make an appointment to give blood as soon as possible by using the Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting RedCrossBlood.org or calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-73-2767).

 

Blood drive safety 

Each Red Cross blood drive and donation center follows the highest standards of safety and infection control, and?additional precautions?– including face masks for donors and staff, regardless of vaccination status – have been implemented to help protect the health of all those in attendance. Donors are?asked to schedule an appointment prior to arriving at the drive. 

 

Upcoming blood donation opportunities Oct.16-31
 

Hendricks

Plainfield

10/20/2021: 2 p.m. - 7 p.m., Plainfield Christian Church, 800 N. Dan Jones Road

Morgan

Camby

10/26/2021: 2 p.m. - 7 p.m., Lifeline Baptist Church, 13387 N Slideoff Road

 

Owen

Spencer

10/28/2021: 9 a.m. - 2 p.m., Owen Valley High School, 622  W. Hwy 46

 

Save time during donation

Donors can also save up to 15 minutes at the blood drive by completing a RapidPass®. With RapidPass®, donors complete the pre-donation reading and health history questionnaire online, on the day of donation, from a mobile device or computer. To complete a RapidPass®, follow the instructions at RedCrossBlood.org/RapidPass or use the Red Cross Blood Donor App.

 

To donate blood, individuals need to bring a blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification that are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age in most states (16 with parental consent where allowed by state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also must meet certain height and weight requirements.

 

Health insights for donors 

At a time when health information has never been more important, the Red Cross is screening all blood, platelet and plasma donations from self-identified African American donors for the sickle cell trait. This additional screening will provide Black donors with an additional health insight and help the Red Cross identify compatible blood types more quickly to help patients with sickle cell disease who require trait-negative blood. Blood transfusion is an essential treatment for those with sickle cell disease, and blood donations from individuals of the same race, ethnicity and blood type have a unique ability to help patients fighting sickle cell disease.    

 

Donors can expect to receive sickle cell trait screening results, if applicable, within one to two weeks through the Red Cross Blood Donor App and the online donor portal at RedCrossBlood.org.  

American Forage and Grassland Council (AFGC) Essay Contest

The AFGC National Youth in Forage Management Essay Contest 2022 rules and information is now available. The AFGC is now soliciting entries for its Youth in Forage Management Essay Contest. This contest is funded by the generous support of Progressive Forage. Prize money is awarded to the top two essays in each category as well as a one-year complimentary AFGC student membership.  There are two categories for participants: The categories are based on grades as of January 1, 2021.  Category one is 6th to 9th Grade with a 200 to 400 word essay while Category 2 is 10th to 12th Grade with a 350 to 500 word essay.

Essays are judged with the following criteria: basic essay requirements met, originality, writing quality (grammar, punctuation, style), passion for topic, evidence of forage management knowledge, and interesting to read. Requirements are that essays must be original composition of the entrants and essays must be typed using Times New Roman 12 pt. font. Essay should be single spaced. All submissions must include the authors name, address, city, state and zip, phone number and email address (email and phone are optional). All submissions should include the age category at the top of the essay and total word count.  All submissions must be signed and dated by the author.  If submitted electronically, please send as a Word document attachment.  Subject matter may be anything pertaining to forage management, including but not limited to, personal experiences in grazing or forage management, observation or explanation of forage practices, livestock management on pasture or stored forages, fencing or other equipment related to grazing and forage management, plant or animal species response to grazing management, or any other subject matter related to grazing or forage management.

 A judging panel will judge the essays and all decisions are final. The deadline for the 2022 Youth in Forage Management Essay Contest is November 30, 2021. Entries should be submitted electronically via e-mail to membership@afgc.org as a Word Document or mail to AFGC, PO Box 867, Berea, KY 40403. For additional information call 800.944.2342.

Visit our homepage at http://www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming events

October 12, 19, 26 – Fall Walking Group, 9am, Big Walnut Sports Park, register at 765-301-7641

October 19 – Medicare & Diabetes, Fairgrounds, 2 pm, register at 765-653-8411

October 19 – Pork: The No Hogwash Protein webinar, 12 pm register at https://tinyurl.com/WIAWebinars21

October 25 – ServSafe 1-Day Class and Online Exam, 9am-4pm, register at https://purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

October 27 – November 3, 10, 17 – Grass to Garden Program, virtual, 6 – 9 pm, $50, register at 765-653-8411

November 7 – Putnam 4-H Awards Program, 2 pm, Fairgrounds.

November 11 – Extension office closed for Veteran’s Day Holiday.


October deadline for paid House internships

State Rep. Beau Baird (R-Greencastle) encourages local college students and recent graduates to apply online for internships at the Indiana Statehouse before the Oct. 31 deadline.

 

According to Baird, the House of Representatives offers paid spring internships to college sophomores, juniors, seniors, graduate students and recent graduates of all majors. Interns will work at the Statehouse in Indianapolis for the duration of the 2022 legislative session lasting January through mid-March.

 

"We take pride in providing an environment where students can learn from state leaders and hone their skills," Baird said. "Don't delay in submitting your application for this great and rewarding opportunity."

 

Baird said interns work full time, Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Spring-semester internships are available in several departments working with Indiana House Republicans.

 

Positions are available in the Legislative Operations Department where interns work directly with constituents and help track legislative committee activity. The Communications Department is looking for interns to help write press releases, and work with social media campaigns, graphic design and audio/video production. Baird said the Policy Department is also in need of interns to help research, track and analyze legislation.

 

Interns receive biweekly compensation of $750, free parking, career and professional development support, and enrollment access to an Indiana government class. They can also earn academic credit through their college or university and are eligible to apply for a $3,000 scholarship to use toward undergraduate and graduate expenses.

 

For more information and to apply before the Oct. 31 deadline, visit indianahouserepublicans.com/internship.

Libertarians plan rally over Owen County taxes

Dustin Combs, Temporary Chairman, Libertarian Party of Owen County, submitted the following about a rally in Owen County

 

Members of the Libertarian Party of Indiana are planning a rally at the Owen County courthouse in Spencer, IN on October 12 in response to a recent tax increase. After depleting over $4 million in reserve funds and leaving the county in the red, county officials voted to raise the county income tax to cover the shortfall.

The tax increase took effect on October 1.

The Owen County government has been plagued for years by officials committing financial crimes and chronic overspending. Audit reports from the State Board of Accounts document a government with inadequate checks and balances, lack of training, lack of oversight, and a lack of internal control mechanisms commonly employed to ensure fiscal responsibility. Despite years of warnings from state officials, the county government refused to take steps to rectify this situation and blew through $4 million in reserve funds. Instead of fixing their mistakes, the county government decided to stick the taxpayers with the bill by passing an increase to the county income tax.

“As citizens, it’s up to each one of us to budget responsibly and live within our means. It’s unfair to us that the county gets to haphazardly spend our tax dollars and then saddle us with the bill for even more,” said Dustin Combs, Temporary Chairman of the Libertarian Party of Owen County.

In response to the county’s fiscal irresponsibility, members of the Libertarian Party of Indiana will be hosting a rally outside the Owen County courthouse in Spencer on October 12 at 6:00 p.m. – one hour before the county council meeting – to bring attention to the county’s issues. Andrew Horning, Libertarian candidate for Indiana’s 8th congressional district, as well as Owen County Council candidate Rachel Combs will both be speaking.

The Libertarian Party of Indiana calls on the citizens of Owen County to come out on October 12 and voice their opposition to the county government’s mismanagement of public funds and public trust.


Dustin Combs, Temporary Chairman, Libertarian Party of Owen County, submitted the following about a rally in Owen County

 

Members of the Libertarian Party of Indiana are planning a rally at the Owen County courthouse in Spencer, IN on October 12 in response to a recent tax increase. After depleting over $4 million in reserve funds and leaving the county in the red, county officials voted to raise the county income tax to cover the shortfall.

The tax increase took effect on October 1.

The Owen County government has been plagued for years by officials committing financial crimes and chronic overspending. Audit reports from the State Board of Accounts document a government with inadequate checks and balances, lack of training, lack of oversight, and a lack of internal control mechanisms commonly employed to ensure fiscal responsibility. Despite years of warnings from state officials, the county government refused to take steps to rectify this situation and blew through $4 million in reserve funds. Instead of fixing their mistakes, the county government decided to stick the taxpayers with the bill by passing an increase to the county income tax.

“As citizens, it’s up to each one of us to budget responsibly and live within our means. It’s unfair to us that the county gets to haphazardly spend our tax dollars and then saddle us with the bill for even more,” said Dustin Combs, Temporary Chairman of the Libertarian Party of Owen County.

In response to the county’s fiscal irresponsibility, members of the Libertarian Party of Indiana will be hosting a rally outside the Owen County courthouse in Spencer on October 12 at 6:00 p.m. – one hour before the county council meeting – to bring attention to the county’s issues. Andrew Horning, Libertarian candidate for Indiana’s 8th congressional district, as well as Owen County Council candidate Rachel Combs will both be speaking.

The Libertarian Party of Indiana calls on the citizens of Owen County to come out on October 12 and voice their opposition to the county government’s mismanagement of public funds and public trust.

Putnam County want to grow its parks and recreation areas

Putnam County is expanding parks and recreation and it’s not limited to Greencastle parks. The expansion will affect all of Putnam County from Roachdale to Cloverdale and everywhere in between and surrounding. All they need is your input and you can do that via this survey https://tinyurl.com/PutCoparksurvey.

 

The Department of Natural Resources (DNR) has a variety of grant programs designed to help communities expand their recreational spaces and encourage healthily activities. However, the DNR also requires both a county parks and recreation department and a plan. Putnam County Parks and Recreation held their first meeting in July this year for exactly that purpose. Now, they need a plan which is where the community comes in.

 

Purdue Extension Putnam County is assisting with the parks and recreation planning because their goals of a healthy community align with the goals of the county parks and recreation department. They hosted a few different interactive seminars just last week to get opinions and ideas on what the county as a whole needs.

 

By the end of the seminar, participants had voiced their thoughts and voted on multiple ideas under three categories; Healthy Eating, Active Living, and Place making. Many of the ideas involved trails from one town to another within the county, including bike repair stations, different types of parks, and utilizing the natural water trails that run through Putnam County. However, the input provided represents only a small scope of the county. Purdue Extension Putnam County and the Putnam County Parks and Recreation department want the ideas, thoughts, and input of the entire community.

 

The Putnam County Park Board wants your insights as it creates a five-year parks master plan! Survey respondents must be 18 years or older. This survey will take approximately 10 minutes to complete.

 

Link to Survey: https://tinyurl.com/PutCoparksurvey.

 

For questions related to the master plan process or a paper copy of the survey, contact eric@pipecreek.net or (317) 607-5243. For questions related to this survey, contact smith535@purdue.edu or sampsona@purdue.edu.

Grass to Garden Program to be Held October to November

Start a community garden with Purdue Extension, from improving access to fruits and vegetables to educating people how food is grown, community gardens offer many benefits to the city or town you call home.  Learn about the different types of community gardens and how to start a community garden from the ground up during the upcoming Grass to Garden Program. This program is a 4-part series that will take place from 6-9 pm on Oct. 27th, Nov. 3rd, Nov. 10th, and Nov. 17th.

 

This virtual program costs $50 and registration can be completed by calling the Purdue Extension Putnam County office at 765-653-8411. Registration ends Oct. 15th. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution.

Donate today and enter to win the Purple Purse

What does a purple purse have to do with domestic violence and how can you get one?

 

The purple purse is the logo used by the Allstate Foundations program; the color purple represents domestic violence and the purse represents financial empowerment. 1 in 4 women and 1 in 6 men experience domestic violence in the United States and one of the main reasons they cannot leave their abusive partner, is financial abuse. The abusive partner controls the money, making it difficult for the victim to leave or causing them to return to the situation.

 

The Allstate Foundation has been committed to ending domestic violence through financial empowerment since 2005. They have partnered with many resources programs around the country, including Family Support Services of West Central Indiana. The goal is to educate young people about unhealthy relationships, so they can avoid ever being in one. As well as helping survivors with the education and resources they need to be independent again.

 

To show their commitment to ending Domestic Violence and helping victims feel financially empowered, Allstate Foundation partners with select designers every year, creating a limited edition purple purse. This year, in partnership with Greencastle Allstate Agent, Matthew Welker and Allstate Representative Sally Fowler (who serves as the FSSWCI Financial Empowerment Educator), Family Support Services of West Central Indiana will be hosting an opportunity for you to win 1 of 2 Purple Purses available. 

 

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month, and this month for every donation received of $10.00 or more, you will be entered into the drawing to win.  For every gift over $10.00, you will receive an additional entry at each $10.00 increment, for example, $10 = 1 entry, $20 = 2 entries, $100 = 10 entries.  In addition if you sign up for recurring monthly donations you will receive 1 additional entry. 

 

Donations are accepted year-round. However, in order to be eligible for the purple purse drawing, your donation must be received by October 21.

 

If you would like to donate you can visit www.fsswci.net, mail or deliver payment to FSSWCI, Attn: Purple Purse, 16 South Jackson Street, Greencastle, IN 46135.  For questions, please call 765-653-4820, extension 101. 

Foods to Improve Your Skin Health

Remember that old saying, "you are what you eat" which is the basis of good skin color and overall health. Our choice of food and beverages affects all major body systems including the heart, brain and skin. Going to the supermarket or a farmer's market offers plenty of healthy foods that can boost your appearance, as well as, offer some protection from the rays of the sun. Remember, your skin health is dependent on how well you nourish it through dietary choices. Our stressful environment makes it super important to feed our skin the most healthful foods on a daily basis for a glowing complexion. Try these tips:

  • Eat 5–6 cups daily of bright colored veggies such as carrots, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, leafy dark greens. The carotenoids found in these veggies and others have a beneficial impact on reducing skin discoloration that impacts your appearance.
  • Carotenoids are found in fruit and veggies and are potent antioxidants which protect our skin from the sun’s UV rays and helps to protect the skin from sunburn.
  • Stop eating the typical American diet that is high in processed food including fried foods, sugar and salt. Instead, eat lots of veggies, fruit, whole grains, 1% or fat-free dairy, poultry, fish and drink plenty of water. Make sure you consume plenty of colorful vegetables that contain phytochemicals which will keep your skin glowing and healthy.
  • Add 1–2 ounces of almonds to your diet daily. Researchers at the University of California Davis have found skin improves the severity of wrinkles which lessen due to the beneficial fats found in almonds along with other anti-aging antioxidants.
  • Follow the Mediterranean Diet that emphasizes fruit, vegetables, whole grains, poultry, fish, at least two times per week, and limits red meat, sweets, and high fat foods to be "once in a blue moon" foods. Add water or a glass of red wine for adults at the dinner meal. Olive oil is a mainstay of the diet along with plenty of tomatoes that are high in lycopene that helps to prevent skin cancer due to this high antioxidant compound.
  • Consuming dark red grapes contains flavonoids that help to prevent premature aging of the skin by providing protection against the UV-ray-activated reactive oxygen species (ROS) from forming and causing skin cell death. Red grapes are a great snack and provide natural protection against sunburn according to a recent study in Spain.
  • Eating fish weekly has cardiovascular benefits due to Omega-3 fats but now has been shown to prevent photoaging due to astaxanthin, an antioxidant compound found in pink fish such as salmon and arctic char. It accumulates in a person’s skin and it protects against the UV exposure along with water loss from a person’s skin which contributes to wrinkles.

Take these small steps to improve your skin health so it glows and your overall body health improves inside and out. Monthly health message by Karen Ensle EdD, RDN, FAND, CFCS from Rutgers Cooperative Extension of Union County.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local Purdue Extension Office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity institution. All times listed are Eastern Time.

Upcoming Events:

October 5, 12, 19, 26 – Fall Walking Group, 9am, Big Walnut Sports Park, register at 765-301-7641

October 19 – Medicare & Diabetes, Fairgrounds, 2 pm, register by Oct. 12th at 765-653-8411

October 19 – Pork: The No Hogwash Protein webinar, 12 pm register at https://tinyurl.com/WIAWebinars21

October 25 – ServSafe 1-Day Class and Online Exam, 9am-4pm, register at https://purdue.edu/servsafe/workshops

October 27 – November 3, 10, 17 – Grass to Garden Program, virtual, 6 – 9 pm, $50, register at 765-653-8411

Search

Obits

Entertainment