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Community News Archives for 2022-08

Putnam County wants to assess county's health needs

Are you a resident of Putnam County?

 

Do you feel like Putnam County has done a good job of meeting your health needs?

 

Well, here is your chance to sound off, as both the Putnam County Health Department and Putnam County Hospital are in the midst of conducting the 2022 Community Health Needs Assessment, which is designed to offer a look into how health care professionals are meeting the needs of residents and where they can improve. 

 

Residents can respond to a survey at https://forms.gle/EcaKC4q3rjACNSiW9 .

 

The survey is aimed at identifying the county's strengths and weaknesses, and asks respondents various questions pertaining to their health. For example, questions about smoking, vaping, overall physical and mental health, as well as listing the three most important health issues facing Putnam County. 

Train your brain: 10 ways to keep your brain healthy

Did you know, 1 in every 9 people age 65 and older has Alzheimer's, the leading form of dementia. Dementia is a brain condition that affects parts of the brain that control thought, memory, and language. While the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease increases with age, Alzheimer’s disease is not considered a “normal” part of aging.

Growing evidence indicates that people can reduce their risk of cognitive decline by adopting key lifestyle habits. When possible, combine these habits to achieve maximum benefit for the brain and body. Start now. It’s never too late or too early to incorporate healthy habits.

  1. Break a sweat: Engage in regular cardiovascular exercise that elevates your heart rate and increases blood flow to the brain and body. Several studies have found an association between physical activity and reduced risk of cognitive decline.
  2. Hit the books: Formal education in any stage of life will help reduce your risk of cognitive decline and dementia. For example, take a class at a local college, community center or online.
  3. Butt out: Evidence shows that smoking increases risk of cognitive decline. Quitting smoking can reduce that risk to levels comparable to those who have not smoked.
  4. Follow your heart: Evidence shows that risk factors for cardiovascular disease and stroke (obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes) negatively impact your cognitive health. Take care of your heart, and your brain just might follow.
  5. Heads up: Brain injury can raise your risk of cognitive decline and dementia. Wear a seat belt, use a helmet when playing contact sports or riding a bike, and take steps to prevent falls.
  6. Fuel up right: Eat a healthy and balanced diet that is lower in fat and higher in vegetables and fruit to help reduce the risk of cognitive decline. Although research on diet and cognitive function is limited, certain diets, including Mediterranean and Mediterranean-DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension), may contribute to risk reduction.
  7. Catch some Zzz’s: Not getting enough sleep due to conditions like insomnia or sleep apnea may result in problems with memory and thinking.
  8. Take care of your mental health: Some studies link a history of depression with increased risk of cognitive decline, so seek medical treatment if you have symptoms of depression, anxiety or other mental health concerns. Also, try to manage stress.
  9. Buddy up: Staying socially engaged may support brain health. Pursue social activities that are meaningful to you. Find ways to be part of your local community, if you love animals, consider volunteering at a local shelter. If you enjoy singing, join a local choir or help at an after-school program. Or, just share activities with friends and family.
  10. Stump yourself: Challenge and activate your mind. Build a piece of furniture. Complete a jigsaw puzzle. Do something artistic. Play games, such as bridge, that make you think strategically. Challenging your mind may have short and long-term benefits for your brain.

Source: Alzheimer’s Association

Consider registering for the upcoming program “Train your Brain” on September 27th at 6:00PM at the Putnam County Fairgrounds. The program will focus on understanding dementia, the warning signs, and the benefits of early detection and diagnosis. Register by calling 765-653-8411.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events.  Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm.  Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request.  It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs.  While many publications are free, some do have a fee.  All times listed are Eastern Time.  Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events:

Sept. 5 – Labor Day Holiday, Extension Office Closed

Sept. 9, 15, 22, 29 & Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27, Fall Walking group, 9:00am, Big Walnut Sports Park

Sept. 27 – Train your Brain program, 6:00pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

 


Completing 4-Hers in third & sixth grades collect $25

Huge, life defining decisions are in play when one begins to plan and consider post high school education. There are many options and choices that families have for consideration. Doing nothing or making no plans is a decision. Ideally, one would want to be the most informed as possible to make sound and wise decisions.

For many in primary or elementary school, post high school is far off in considering the future. The Putnam 4-H Education Pledge is a program with many elements that will bring information to families enabling an early start to building expectations for post high school education.

The term “post high school education” is used because the discussion should not be centered on a traditional four-year college degree. In fact, the labor markets are hungry for skilled labor that does not involve a college degree and leaving many in work force development pondering how to meet the needs. Furthermore, the program is centered on building the “expectation” of youth seeking some sort of post high school education and realizing the attainment of such education.

 Several studies have shown that there are significant differences in those who have a post high school educational savings plan compared to those who do not have such a plan. Research supports that the money or funds being placed into such accounts is not as much a factor as is building the expectation that one has post high school educational goals and objectives to be met.

The Putnam 4-H Education Pledge will include workforce development and other professional experiences providing youth with life skills needed to find their niche in the work force. The Putnam County 4-H Council is sponsoring $25 payment to 529 plan funds for those in third and sixth grade as of 1/1/22 and plans to continue with future incentive programs for these grades.

Currently, less than eight percent of Putnam youth in grades K-12 have a 529 college savings plan, thus many families are missing out on a key state income tax direct credit. Research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that youth who have a 529 college savings plan for post high school education are greater than 70 percent more likely to go and seek education after high school compared to those who do not. Having an account played a bigger role than the account value.

Only $25 will get one started with college savings using the College Choice 529 Savings plan that is recognized by the state of Indiana to receive a 20 percent direct income tax credit. Parents, grandparents, family etc. can make gifts obtaining a 20 percent direct credit back on state income taxes. The $25 Putnam 4-H match program will only be available to 4-Hers who were in grades three and six as of 1-1-22, completed a Putnam 4-H program and these individuals need to bring the UGift form associated with the account to receive the $25 into the account. Bingo… the child now has at least $50 saved for post high school education!

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

Aug. 22 – 4-H Projects picked up from Indiana State Fair

Aug. 23 – 4-H Projects picked up by Extension staff available for pickup

Sept. 2 – My Record of Achievement 4-H due to Extension Office, see 8/16 email.

Sept. 5 – Labor Day Holiday, Extension Office Closed

Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28 – Dining with Diabetes, 2-3:30pm, FREE, register at 765-653-8411 or sampsona@purdue.edu

Sept. 9, 15, 22, 29 & Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27 – Putnam County Fall Walking group, 9:00am, Big Walnut Sports Park

Sept. 27 – Train your Brain: Ways to Keep Your Brain Healthy program, 6:00pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

Legion Riders of Cloverdale American Legion Post 281 are Cruisin' for Cammie

The public is invited to an event Saturday to help raise funds for a child battling cancer.

 

The Legion Riders of Cloverdale American Legion Post 281 will be holding a Cruisin' for Cammie event to raise funds for Cammie, a 13-year-old who was recently diagnosed with bone cancer.

 

The family has been traveling from their home in Terre Haute to Riley Children's Hospital for surgery and treatments recently and the event is designed to raise funds to help offset travel and medical expenses.

 

Event organizers have said the event is open to anyone and any vehicle. It also features a 50/50 and auction. 

 

Registration will be from 9-10:15 a.m. at Post 281, 501 S. Main St. (U.S. 231), Cloverdale, with kick stands up at 10:30 a.m. 


Common tomato problems

No one enjoys dutifully tending to their garden all growing season and ultimately ending up with a poor tomato crop. Sadly, tomatoes can fall victim to a number of diseases and funguses that can impact the plant or the fruit itself. Additionally, there are a number of insects that can damage your tomato plants. 

Typically, the number one issue related to the fruit of the tomato plant deals with tomatoes that have sunken in, scarred bottoms. This problem is Blossom-end Rot. Blossom-end Rot is a dry, black, leathery scar on the blossom-end of the fruit brought on by a calcium deficiency. To prevent this, try to ensure your plant always has proper moisture.

Other common issues that impact the fruit are Fruit Cracks, Sunscald, and Catfacing. Fruit Cracks will usually occur during hot rainy periods when the fruit is exposed to the sun. Although the fruit does not look appealing, it can still be utilized.

Sunscald is when the fruit will first develop a yellow or white patch that will later blister and dry. This occurs when there is poor foliage cover resulting in the fruit being exposed to sun. This often happens when the tomato plant has been pruned, staked improperly, or you have sprawling plants. The best prevention for sunscald is to cage your plants when possible.

Catfacing is the puckering and scarring at the blossom end of the fruit. The cavities created by Catfacing may penetrate deep into the fruit making it impossible to eat. This is often caused by cool cloudy weather when the plant is blooming or when some herbicides are used.  

When it comes to insects impacting your tomatoes, the biggest culprit is the tomato hornworm. Tomato hornworms are green and white worms that are known for their protruding “horn.” They can be up to 4 inches long and are known for destroying the foliage of tomato plants and eating the green fruit. Please note that tomato hornworms are known to also feed on peppers, eggplants, and potatoes. The best solution for a gardener is to take time and hand pick/remove any tomato hornworms from their plants. Once removed, you can squish them, drop them in water, or dispose of them in your preferred method.

If you would like to know more about tomato problems, feel free to view this short video developed in 2020 about tomato production: https://youtu.be/ODWhm1UJ-rk Purdue Extension Putnam County staff also made videos related to the:

Use of Tomatoes - https://youtu.be/DMGdISfT8Vk
Use of Berries - https://youtu.be/8jBRq47NoO4
Growing Berries - https://youtu.be/XxDzCKkjWY0
Use of Herbs - https://youtu.be/UMlJKcVlkHA
Growing Herbs - https://youtu.be/rO4M-K0D4Po

If you have any questions after viewing the videos, please contact Jenna Nees at smith535@purdue.edu or Abbi Sampson at sampsona@purdue.edu.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events.  Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm.  Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request.  It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs.  While many publications are free, some do have a fee.  All times listed are Eastern Time.  Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

 

Upcoming Events:

Aug. 21 – Indiana State Fair Ends

Aug. 22 – 4-H Projects picked up from Indiana State Fair

Sept. 5 – Labor Day Holiday, Extension Office Closed

Sept. 9, 15, 22, 29 & Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27 – Putnam County Fall Walking group, 9:00am, Big Walnut Sports Park

Sept. 27 – Train your Brain: Ways to Keep Your Brain Healthy program, 6:00pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

New cabin at McCormick's Creek SP available for rent Friday

DNR Director Dan Bortner and Indiana State Parks staff dedicated a new family cabin at McCormick’s Creek State Park on Aug. 5.

 

Called the Sunset Cabin, the new overnight option at the state park is available for reservations starting at noon tomorrow. Reservations can be made at camp.IN.gov or by calling 866-622-6746.

 

The 1,400-square foot cabin has a fully accessible entrance and first floor, sleeps eight and is air-conditioned and heated, so it is available for use year-round. It is located in the family cabin area and overlooks the McCormick’s Cove Nature Preserve. The design and layout is similar to that of the Centennial Cabin, which was constructed and dedicated during Indiana State Parks’ centennial year in 2016.

 

A portion of the funding for the Sunset Cabin was donated by the Luetkemeier family. The family has vacationed at McCormick’s Creek State Park every year for 70 years, spanning four generations. The Friends of McCormick’s Creek State Park also supported the project with funding and logistical work.

 

The rental cost for the cabin is $199 per night Sunday-Wednesday, $209 per night Thursday-Saturday, and $219 per night on holidays, plus applicable taxes. From mid-June to mid-August, weekly rental is required. During the rest of the year, a two-night minimum is required.

 

Reservations can be made up to a year in advance for this and all other Indiana state park-operated cabins.


Duke Energy reminds residents that safe digging starts with 811

Aug. 11 is officially “811 Day,” and as residents continue summer yard projects, Duke Energy wants to remind everyone to call 811 before digging to prevent potential personal injury and avoid electric outages.

 

“Keeping our customers safe and protecting our underground utility infrastructure are top priorities,” said Stan Pinegar, president of Duke Energy Indiana. “Even simple digging jobs can cause serious injuries and disrupt vital utility services to communities, so it is important to call 811 to prevent unnecessary and potentially dangerous situations and outages in our communities.”

 

The national “811 Call Before You Dig” system was created so anyone who plans to dig can make a free call to have underground utility lines clearly marked. Contractors, homeowners, business owners and anyone preparing for a digging project should call 811 at least three business days before digging begins. The local utilities will then send a crew to mark underground lines in the area (electric, natural gas, water, sewer, phone, cable TV and others) with stakes, flags or paint.

 

From January to June 2022, Duke Energy reported nearly 260 cuts to its underground electric lines in Indiana.

 

“Our best defense is awareness and ongoing education to call 811 before you dig,” added Pinegar. “We are committed to sharing this message with our customers and communities to avoid these accidents.”

 

For a video that shows how to use 811, click here. For additional information about 811, visit Call 811 Before You Dig. To get in touch with the 811 center in your state, dial 811 or visit Call811.com.

Duke Energy reminds residents that safe digging starts with 811

Aug. 11 is officially “811 Day,” and as residents continue summer yard projects, Duke Energy wants to remind everyone to call 811 before digging to prevent potential personal injury and avoid electric outages.

 

“Keeping our customers safe and protecting our underground utility infrastructure are top priorities,” said Stan Pinegar, president of Duke Energy Indiana. “Even simple digging jobs can cause serious injuries and disrupt vital utility services to communities, so it is important to call 811 to prevent unnecessary and potentially dangerous situations and outages in our communities.”

 

The national “811 Call Before You Dig” system was created so anyone who plans to dig can make a free call to have underground utility lines clearly marked. Contractors, homeowners, business owners and anyone preparing for a digging project should call 811 at least three business days before digging begins. The local utilities will then send a crew to mark underground lines in the area (electric, natural gas, water, sewer, phone, cable TV and others) with stakes, flags or paint.

 

From January to June 2022, Duke Energy reported nearly 260 cuts to its underground electric lines in Indiana.

 

“Our best defense is awareness and ongoing education to call 811 before you dig,” added Pinegar. “We are committed to sharing this message with our customers and communities to avoid these accidents.”

 

For a video that shows how to use 811, click here. For additional information about 811, visit Call 811 Before You Dig. To get in touch with the 811 center in your state, dial 811 or visit Call811.com.

 

 


Start walking for exercise

There are many benefits to leading an active lifestyle.  Participation in regular physical activity decreases the risk of many chronic diseases, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis, and breast, colon, bladder, kidney, and lung cancer.  In addition, an active lifestyle can improve your cholesterol, lower blood pressure, improve sleep, and increase energy.  But you don’t have to join a gym or buy expensive equipment to get these benefits.  Walking is a great way to increase your physical activity.

Why walking?  Walking is one of the best types of physical activities because it is accessible to almost everyone, doesn’t require specific skills or equipment, is inexpensive, can be done in a variety of settings (in your neighborhood, at the mall, around a track), and can be performed at any chosen intensity.

How to get started

  • Start slow and easy.  If you haven’t gone for a walk in a while, walk 10 minutes to start.
  • Pay attention to your posture.  Walk with your head lifted, eyes forward, and tummy pulled in.
  • Focus on breathing.  If you can’t talk during your walks, you are trying to do too much.  Slow down and take a few deep breaths.  If you can sing, you are doing too little.  Pick up your pace a bit.
  • Bring water and wear a hat on sunny days.
  • Wear a comfortable pair of gym shoes.  If your shoes are new, break them in before starting your walk.
  • Slowly increase the pace, distance, and/or frequency of your walks.

Set goals

  • Set short-term and long-term goals.  If you currently don’t have a walking routine, try setting a short-term goal of 10–15 minutes of walking 4–5 times a week.  After you have met this goal for a few weeks, gradually increase the time and frequency of your walks.
  • Set a long-term goal of walking 30-60 minutes, 5-7 days a week.
  • Add your walks into your calendar or to-do list.  This helps make your walks part of your daily routine instead of an extracurricular activity.

Tips to add walking into every day

  • Park farther away from your place of work, the grocery store, the mall entrance, etc.
  • Walk during your lunch break.
  • Instead of having coffee with friends, take a walk with them.
  • While at work, instead of emailing a colleague, walk to that person’s desk.
  • Whenever you are on your cellphone, stand up and walk around.

Join Us! Putnam County Fall Walking is being offered for any age and any fitness level, starting September 8th for 8 consecutive Thursday’s at 9AM.  Location will be at Big Walnut Sports Park.  Feel free to join us as your schedule allows for friendship and fitness.  No need to register. Show up for as many as you can!

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events.  Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm.  Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request.  It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs.  While many publications are free, some do have a fee.  All times listed are Eastern Time.  Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

Aug. 21 – Indiana State Fair Ends

Aug. 22 – 4-H Projects picked up from Indiana State Fair

Sept. 5 – Labor Day Holiday, Extension Office Closed

Sept. 9, 15, 22, 29 & Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27 – Putnam County Fall Walking group, 9:00am, Big Walnut Sports Park

Sept. 27 – Train your Brain: Ways to Keep Your Brain Healthy program, 6:00pm, Fairgrounds, register at 765-653-8411

 


2022 Harris Hall Open Class Ag & Horticulture exhibits

For 2022, there were 1018 entries in Harris Hall.  This included 143 exhibits by Lil’ Sprouts (youth ages 4 through 2nd grade). 

 

Agriculture Awards

Grand Champion Eggs - Becky Samsel 

Res. Grand Champion Eggs - Maggie Hodge

Grand Champion Hay - Riah Perkins

Res. Grand Champion Hay - Riah Perkins

Grand Champion Honey - Tavia Pigg

Res. Grand Champion Honey - Terri Maher

Grand Champion Maple Product - Jeff Brown

Champion Largest Sunflower Head - Bud Carpenter

Res. Champion Largest Sunflower Head - Mikinley Cantonwine

Champion Soybeans with Most Pods - Curt Richardson 

Champion Tallest Corn - Carter Ames

Champion Tallest Sunflower - Tracy Trivett

Res. Champion Tallest Sunflower - Bud Carpenter

Champion Largest Leaf Blade - Jane Jackson

Res. Champion Largest Leaf Blade - Ryan Nees

Champion Largest Egg - Les Brown 

Res. Champion Largest Egg - McKinley Cantonwine

 

Artistic Arrangement Awards

Grand Champion Overall Arrangement - Willia Williamson

Res. Grand Champion Overall Arrangement - Vickie Whicker 

Champion Eventful - Vickie Whicker 

Res. Champion Eventful - Lawrence Williamson 

Champion Hiways and Byways - Liz Davies

Res. Champion Hiways and Byways - Willia Williamson

Champion In Good Taste - Kristie Spear

Res. Champion In Good Taste - Willia Williamson

Champion Small Fry - Kristie Spear

Res. Champion Small Fry - Cynthia Brown 

Champion Sunrise - Sunset - Willia Williamson

Res. Champion Sunrise - Sunset - Margaret Kenton

Overall Artistic By Points - Willia Williamson

All Roads Lead to the Fair Exhibit Winner - Liz Davies

In The Beginning (Rookie Award) - Kristie Spear

 

Container Gardening Awards

Grand Champion Overall Container Garden - Parker Haddon

Res. Grand Champion Overall Container Garden - Maggie Hodge

Champion Hanging - Indoor Container - Pat Johnson

Champion Hanging - Outdoor Container - Kim Dickerson 

Res. Champion Hanging - Outdoor Container - Becky Samsel 

Champion Container - Indoor - Vickie Whicker 

Res. Champion Container - Indoor - Sue Matson 

Champion Container - Outdoor - Parker Haddon

Res. Champion Container - Outdoor - Hudson Schopmeyer

Champion Cactus or Succulent - Maggie Hodge

Res. Champion Cactus or Succulent - Jeanne Sibbitt 

Champion Other Garden - Jason Keeney

Res. Champion Other Garden - Claire Winings

 

Cut Flower Awards

Grand Champion Overall Cut Flower - Melissa Brown 

Res. Grand Champion Overall Cut Flower - Kristie Spear

Overall Rookie Cut Flower Exhibitor (by points) - Kristie Spear

Champion Annual - Cyndi Blocher

Res. Champion Annual - Sharon Broadstreet

Champion Bachelor Button - Liz Davies

Res. Champion Bachelor Button - Jane Jackson

Champion Cosmos - Becky Samsel 

Res. Champion Cosmos - Lawrence Williamson 

Champion Dahlia - Kristie Spear

Res. Champion Dahlia - Becky Samsel 

Champion Daisy - Sue Baxter

Res. Champion Daisy - Cyndi Blocher

Champion Daylily - Willia Williamson

Res. Champion Daylily - Cyndi Blocher

Champion Echinacea - Cyndi Blocher

Res. Champion Echinacea - McKinley Cantonwine

Champion Fern - Melissa Brown 

Res. Champion Fern - Pat Johnson 

Champion Flowering Shrub - Michelle Sanders

Res. Champion Flowering Shrub - Carrie Little

Champion Gladiolus - Sue Baxter

Res. Champion Gladiolus - Willia Williamson

Champion Hosta - Willia Williamson

Res. Champion Hosta - Lisa Sims

Champion Lily - Willia Williamson

Res. Champion Lily              Lawrence Williamson 

Champion Marigold - John Romalia

Res. Champion Marigold - My Gilley

Champion Ornamental Grass - Pat Johnson 

Res. Champion Ornamental Grass - Jeanne Sibbitt 

Champion Perennial - Lawrence Williamson 

Res. Champion Perennial - Terri Maher

Champion Petunia - Michelle Sanders

Res. Champion Petunia - Parker Haddon

Champion Phlox - Shelbe Felling

Res. Champion Phlox - Martha Klock 

Champion Rookie Cut Flower - Kristie Spear

Res. Champion Rookie Cut Flower - Maebrie Cantonwine

Champion Rose - Melissa Brown 

Res. Champion Rose - Carrie Little

Champion Rudbeckia - Pat Johnson 

Res. Champion Rudbeckia           - Lawrence Williamson 

Champion Specialty - Pat Johnson 

Res. Champion Specialty - Cyndi Blocher

Champion Sunflower - Becky Samsel 

Res. Champion Sunflower - Willia Williamson

Champion Zinnia - Kristie Spear

Res. Champion Zinnia - Tavia Pigg

 

Garden Awards

Grand Champion Overall Garden - Bob Zaring 

Res. Grand Champion Overall Garden - Terri Maher 

Rookie Garden (by points) - Maebrie Cantonwine

Champion Beans - Greene Henry 

Res. Champion Beans - Beth Connell 

Champion Cabbage - Bud Carpenter

Res. Champion Cabbage - Maebrie Cantonwine

Champion Carrot - Bud Carpenter

Res. Champion Carrot - Anna Miller 

Champion Cucumbers - Bob Zaring 

Res. Champion Cucumbers - Bud Carpenter

Champion Eggplant - Pat Johnson 

Res. Champion Eggplant - Maebrie Cantonwine

Champion Onions - Gabor Dickerson 

Res. Champion Onions - Maebrie Cantonwine

Champion Peppers - John Romalia

Res. Champion Pepper - Bob Zaring 

Champion Potato - Terri Maher

Res. Champion Potato - Jeanne Sibbitt 

Champion Squash - Bob Zaring 

Res. Champion Squash - Bob Zaring 

Champion Tomato - Bob Zaring 

Res. Champion Tomato - Beth Connell 

Champion Rookie Garden Specimen - Maebrie Cantonwine

Res. Champion Rookie Garden Specimen - Terri Maher

Champion Cabbage, Largest by Weight - Bud Carpenter

Res. Champion Cabbage, Largest by Weight - Maebrie Cantonwine

Champion Potato, Largest by Weight - Maebrie Cantonwine

Res. Champion Potato, Largest by Weight - Dale Cantonwine

Champion Pumpkin, Largest by Weight - Alton Henry

Res. Champion Pumpkin, Largest by Weight - Maebrie Cantonwine

Champion Squash (Zucchini), Largest by Weight - Sue Stattner

Res. Champion Squash (Zucchini), Largest by Weight - Maggie Hodge

Champion Tomato, Largest by Weight - Bud Carpenter

Res. Champion Tomato, Largest by Weight - Maebrie Cantonwine

Champion Market Exhibit - Anna Miller 

Res. Champion Market Exhibit - Gabor Dickerson 

 

Herb Awards

Grand Champion Overall Herb - Pat Johnson 

Res. Grand Champion Overall Herb - Pat Johnson 

Rookie Herb (by points) - Cynthia Brown 

Champion Basil - Pat Johnson 

Res. Champion Basil - Cynthia Brown 

Champion Chives - Tavia Pigg

Res. Champion Chives - Pat Johnson 

Champion Dill Weed - Pat Johnson 

Res. Champion Dill Weed - Terri Maher

Champion Garlic - Angela Kiste

Res. Champion Garlic - Terri Maher

Champion Mint - Cynthia Brown 

Res. Champion Mint - Vickie Whicker 

Champion Parsley - Tavia Pigg

Res. Champion Parsley - Vickie Whicker 

Champion Savory - Audrey Birtchman 

Res. Champion Savory - Vickie Whicker 

Champion Thyme - Vickie Whicker 

Res. Champion Thyme - Vickie Whicker 

Champion Wormwood - Pat Johnson 

Res. Champion Wormwood - Vickie Whicker 

Champion Rookie Herb Specimen - Michelle Sanders

Res. Champion Rookie Herb Specimen - Terri Maher

Champion Unlisted Variety Herb - Pat Johnson 

Res. Champion Unlisted Variety Herb - Becky Samsel 

Champion Potted Herbs - Terri Maher 

Res. Champion Potted Herbs - Becky Samsel 

 

Overall Harris Hall Awards

Overall Harris Hall Exhibitor (by points) - Pat Johnson 

Overall Harris Hall Rookie Exhibitor (by points) - Maebrie Cantonwine

People's Choice Garden Art - Jane Jackson

Thanks for the memories

As a follow-up to Jared Jernagan’s “Last Minute Musings” so well stated on Monday, July 25 for the following day’s edition of the Banner Graphic, I would like to share one of my favorite instances at the Putnam County Fair. It was not a first occurrence, rather a memorable encounter with a young 4th grader in the swine barn.

While making our rounds at the fairgrounds with my co-worker Kim Beadles, a young boy approached me and said, “Do you want to see my pigs?” Without hesitation I replied, “Yes we would love to see your pigs!” We were just probably about ten steps away from the pens that we learned contained the seven or eight pigs to be exhibited by he and his brother. We also quickly learned that his favorite breed was “spots” and we continued to listen. I couldn’t help but to wonder what was the connection of motivation to be so excited to reach out to us to share about his pigs? We continued to listen and then the answer came very clearly. This young Putnam 4-Her stated, “You came and talked to my class at school and so I wanted to show you my pigs.” We responded, “Thanks for showing us your pigs and we hope to see you again in your school.”  We just loved the enthusiasm of this young 4-Her.

This made our day and quite frankly the week. Later I pondered this encounter and thought to myself, what if I was too tired or busy and had not taken this time with this young 4-Her. How many times do I miss these types of wonderful exchanges because I don’t take enough time to smell the roses along the way?

At the end of the day, I was very thankful for this situation and considered the impact all of our 4-H volunteers have on our youth to provide teaching and learning opportunities that are never forgotten to build life skills. This exchange also reaffirmed my belief that while many put emphasis on the county fair event, 4-H youth development is a year around program. The school visits to grade two and three to recruit for 4-H, school programs for youth grades 3-12 providing an array of topics and county wide field days all provide opportunities throughout the year for youth to begin to recognize the connections to the county 4-H program.

As we move to wrapping up another program while approaching September and kicking off a new program year in October, Extension staff would like to personally thank all volunteers and the community as a whole for the support provided to the Putnam County 4-H program.

Visit our homepage at www.extension.purdue.edu/putnam or you can contact the local office by calling 765.653.8411 for more information regarding this week’s column topic or to RSVP for upcoming events. Office hours are Monday thru Friday from 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-4:00pm. Evening and lunch appointments are available, upon request. It is always best to call first to assure items are ready when you arrive and to RSVP for programs. While many publications are free, some do have a fee. All times listed are Eastern Time. Purdue University is an equal access/equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

Upcoming Events

Aug. 9 – Food Preservation/Canning workshop, Johnson Co. Fairgrounds, 11am-4pm, register at https://cvent.me/kagOyz

Aug. 21 – Indiana State Fair Ends

Aug. 22 – 4-H Projects picked up from Indiana State Fair

Sept. 5 – Labor Day Holiday, Extension Office Closed

Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28 – Dining with Diabetes, 2-3:30pm, FREE, register at 765-653-8411 or sampsona@purdue.edu

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